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Female bisexuality from adolescence to adulthood: results from a 10-year longitudinal study.
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Female bisexuality from adolescence to adulthood: results from a 10-year longitudinal study.

Author: LM Diamond Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Utah, 380 South 1530 East, Room 502, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0251, USA. diamond@psych.utah.edu
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Developmental psychology, 2008 Jan; 44(1): 5-14
Database:From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine.
Other Databases: ERICBritish Library SerialsElsevierArticleFirst
Summary:
Debates persist over whether bisexuality is a temporary stage of denial or transition, a stable "3rd type" of sexual orientation, or a heightened capacity for sexual fluidity. The present study uses 5 waves of longitudinal data collected from 79 lesbian, bisexual, and "unlabeled" women to evaluate these models. Both the "3rd orientation" and "fluidity" models had support, but the "transitional stage" model did not.  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: LM Diamond Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Utah, 380 South 1530 East, Room 502, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0251, USA. diamond@psych.utah.edu
ISSN:0012-1649
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 263937107
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Abstract:

Debates persist over whether bisexuality is a temporary stage of denial or transition, a stable "3rd type" of sexual orientation, or a heightened capacity for sexual fluidity. The present study uses 5 waves of longitudinal data collected from 79 lesbian, bisexual, and "unlabeled" women to evaluate these models. Both the "3rd orientation" and "fluidity" models had support, but the "transitional stage" model did not. Over 10 years, 2/3 of women changed the identity labels they had claimed at the beginning of the study, and 1/3 changed labels 2 or more times. Yet, contrary to the "transitional stage" model, more women adopted bisexual/unlabeled identities than relinquished these identities; few bisexual/unlabeled women ended up identifying as lesbian or heterosexual. Overall, the most commonly adopted identity was "unlabeled." Bisexual/unlabeled women had stable overall distributions of same-sex/other-sex attractions but greater absolute fluctuations in attractions from assessment to assessment than lesbians. All women reported declines in their ratio of same-sex to other-sex behavior over time. These findings demonstrate that the distinction between lesbianism and bisexuality is a matter of degree rather than kind.

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