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Female genital cutting : cultural conflict in the global community

Author: Elizabeth Heger Boyle
Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this study, sociologist Elizabeth Heger Boyle examines this controversial issue from the perspectives of the international system, governments, and individuals. Drawing on previous scholarship, records of international organizations, demographic surveys, and the popular media, Boyle examines how the issue is perceived and acted upon at international, national, and individual levels. Grounding her work in the  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Elizabeth Heger Boyle
ISBN: 0801870631 9780801870637
OCLC Number: 48691380
Description: xiii, 188 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Understanding female genital cutting --
The evolution of debates over female genital cutting --
International mobilization --
The diffusion of national policies against female genital cutting --
Variation in the meanings of national policies --
Individual response : a clash of alternative meaning systems --
Individual frame resonance : explanations for opposing female genital cutting.
Responsibility: Elizabeth Heger Boyle.
More information:

Abstract:

"In this study, sociologist Elizabeth Heger Boyle examines this controversial issue from the perspectives of the international system, governments, and individuals. Drawing on previous scholarship, records of international organizations, demographic surveys, and the popular media, Boyle examines how the issue is perceived and acted upon at international, national, and individual levels. Grounding her work in the sociological theory of neoinstitutionalism, Boyle describes how the choices made by governments and individual women are influenced by the often conflicting principles of individual human rights and sovereign autonomy. She concludes that, while globalization may exacerbate such conflicts, it can ultimately lead to social change."--Jacket.

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