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The fictive world of Conrad Aiken : a celebration of consciousness

Author: Catharine F Seigel
Publisher: Dekalb : Northern Illinois University Press, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Early in his career Conrad Aiken observed, "If we begin by understanding ourselves, as far as we can, we progress toward an understanding of man and his potentialities ... Let us be as conscious as possible." In this statement, Aiken summarized the driving motivation of his writing, a theme that figured prominently in his work throughout his life. Seigel illuminates the importance of consciousness in Aiken's fiction  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Conrad Aiken; Conrad Aiken; Conrad Aiken
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Catharine F Seigel
ISBN: 0875801722 9780875801728
OCLC Number: 25282232
Description: 222 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Responsibility: Catharine F. Seigel.

Abstract:

Early in his career Conrad Aiken observed, "If we begin by understanding ourselves, as far as we can, we progress toward an understanding of man and his potentialities ... Let us be as conscious as possible." In this statement, Aiken summarized the driving motivation of his writing, a theme that figured prominently in his work throughout his life. Seigel illuminates the importance of consciousness in Aiken's fiction through readings of his five novels - Blue Voyage, Great Circle, King Coffin, A Heart for the Gods of Mexico, Conversation - and his controversial novel/autobiography, Ushant. She traces chronologically through these works Aiken's theory of evolving consciousness, which had as its wellspring the violent murder/suicide of his parents. She finds that full appreciation of Aiken's fiction, which has sometimes left even his critics puzzled, depends on a firm understanding of his life events and his developing philosophy. Believing that consciousness is humankind's supreme gift, Aiken pursued self-revelation through writing, which he used as a medium to come to terms with his existence. Seigel demonstrates that Aiken rewrote his autobiography throughout his entire career. His novels, as well as his poetry and short fiction, retell his life. She offers as evidence his last major work, Ushant, a fictionalized though faithful autobiography that discloses many of the pivotal incidents in his stories. Seigel sheds light on Aiken's unique contributions to the twentieth-century American novel through her exploration of his theory of consciousness. Arguing that Aiken's philosophical insights into consciousness continue to be relevant, she clarifies his sometimes ambiguous artistry and suggests new ways for readers to approach his fiction.

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Linked Data


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