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Fighting for the First Amendment : Stanton of CBS vs. Congress and the Nixon White House

Author: Corydon B Dunham
Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Here is an inside look at how a Congressional Committee, supported by the Nixon White House, sought to establish control over broadcast news by investigating editorial news judgment. Frank Stanton, legendary President of CBS, refused to produce outtakes from the award-winning documentary, "The Selling of the Pentagon," subpoenaed by the Committee in an attempt to condemn the program and CBS. The Committee voted to  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Dunham, Corydon B., 1927-
Fighting for the First Amendment.
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 1997
(OCoLC)605302103
Named Person: Frank Stanton; Frank Stanton
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Corydon B Dunham
ISBN: 0275960277 9780275960278
OCLC Number: 36977152
Description: xiii, 233 p. : port. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Congressional subpoena --
'The Selling of the Pentagon' --
Staggers' first hearing on the subpoena --
Stanton: the broadcast executive --
Stanton in Washington --
Congress and television news --
The White House --
Opposition programming and 'The selling of the Pentagon' --
Is this fight really necessary? --
'You are in contempt' --
Down to the wire --
'Dear colleagues' --
The Constitutional debate: historic moment for the press --
The public's interest --
On a personal note: Stanton's departure.
Other Titles: Stanton of CBS vs. Congress and the Nixon White House
Responsibility: Corydon B. Dunham ; foreword by Walter Cronkite.

Abstract:

An inside look at how a Congressional Committee, supported by the Nixon White House, sought to establish control over broadcast news. The text examines the ongoing conflict between media and  Read more...

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"This brilliant look at a major event in American broadcasting's battle to be free is a marvelous tribute to Frank Stanton's courage and his position as one of the greatest figures in broadcast Read more...

 
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schema:description"Here is an inside look at how a Congressional Committee, supported by the Nixon White House, sought to establish control over broadcast news by investigating editorial news judgment. Frank Stanton, legendary President of CBS, refused to produce outtakes from the award-winning documentary, "The Selling of the Pentagon," subpoenaed by the Committee in an attempt to condemn the program and CBS. The Committee voted to hold Stanton and CBS in contempt, and the House of Representatives held a full debate on its power to investigate and control broadcast news. Had Stanton not taken up the fight he describes to gain First Amendment protection, broadcast news would have been shaped by Congressional hearings and intimidation. Finally Stanton's story is told in his own words in this account of his fight to secure First Amendment freedom for the news media. This book examines the ongoing conflict between media and government and dismisses the theory that press regulation by a government agency is desirable. CBS's fight over "The Selling of the Pentagon" clearly illustrates how government interference can keep vital information from the public. Broadcast news history shows that press regulations are not benign - despite government claims - and once they are in place, neither great resources nor the urgent need for truth may fully remove them. As public opinion polls show increasing support for such regulations, Stanton's story serves as a timely reminder of the need for a press free of government interference, as print, cable, broadcast, and satellite news move onto the Information Superhighway."
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