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Filmmaking for dummies

Author: Bryan Michael Stoller
Publisher: Hoboken, NJ : Wiley Pub., ©2009.
Series: --For dummies
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Synopsis: Now updated the step by step secrets to capturing great moments on film. With all the recent advancements in filmmaking technology, more people than ever are trying their hand at filmmaking. Keeping up with the newest information in this booming field, this updated edition of Filmmaking For Dummies features up-to-the-minute coverage of the latest and greatest hardware, software, accessories, and trends  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Bryan Michael Stoller
ISBN: 9780470386941 0470386940
OCLC Number: 279459852
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xxi, 360 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Foreword --
Introduction --
About this book --
Conventions used in this book --
What you're not to read --
Foolish assumptions --
How this book is organized --
Part 1: Filmmaking And Storytelling --
Part 2: Gearing up to make your film --
Part 3: Ready to roll: Starting production on your film --
Part 4: Finishing your film in post --
Part 5: Finding a distributor for your film --
Part 6: Part of tens --
Icons used in this book --
Where to go from here --
Part 1: Filmmaking And Storytelling --
Chapter 1: So you want to be a filmmaker --
Independents day versus the Hollywood way --
Filmmaking: traditional or digital? --
Traditional: super-8, 16mm, or 35mm --
Going digital: standard or high-def --
Developing your sense of story --
Financing your film: where's the money --
On a budget: scheduling your shoot --
Planning your shoot, shooting your plan --
Hiring your cast and crewing up --
Shooting in the right direction --
Seeing the light --
Being heard and scene --
Actors taking your direction --
Directing through the camera --
Cut it out! Editing your film --
Listening to your film --
Simulating film with software --
Distributing your film and finding an audience --
Chapter 2: Genres in general --
Exploring film genres --
Making 'em laugh with comedy --
Getting dramatic about it --
Horrifying horror films --
Romancing the romantic --
Getting physical: no talk and all action --
Separating fact from (science) fiction --
Indulging your fantasy --
Go west, young man: Westerns --
Going to war --
Thrilling audiences with suspense --
Stealing the audience's attention: crime pays --
Making music with musicals --
Kidding around: family friendly films --
Categorizing your genres --
Featuring films --
Made-for-TV movie --
Documenting documentaries --
Shooting short films: keep it brief! --
Directing television programs --
Directing commercials --
Minding your PSAs: public service announcements --
Feel like dancing? Music videos --
Industrials: industrial strength --
Chapter 3: Penning and pitching a great story --
Screening for the perfect screenplay --
Write way to find a writer --
Adapting: a novel idea --
Writing your own original screenplay --
Structuring your screenplay --
Creating conflict --
Developing characters --
Drafting your screenplay: scene by scene --
Collaborating with writer's software --
Formatting your screenplay --
Selling your screenplay to a production studio --
Distributor, or investor --
Getting your foot (and screenplay) in the door --
Pitching a home run --
Part 2: Gearing Up to Make Your Film --
Chapter 4: Scheduling and budgeting your film --
Art of scheduling a film --
Lining your script --
Breaking into breakdown sheets --
Creating production strips --
Stripping down your schedule --
Scheduling software to make your life easier --
Balancing your film budget --
Tightrope walking above the line --
Handing below the line --
Topping your budget --
Budgeting for budget software --
Factoring in a contingency amount --
Insurance is your best policy --
Finding an insurance broker --
Bond, completion bond --
Chapter 5: Financing your film --
Creating an enticing prospectus --
Synopsis of your film --
Information about you --
Info about your cast and crew --
Your budget and profit projections --
Investigating investors --
Locating potential investors: show me the money! --
Approaching a potential investor --
Keeping the securities and exchange commission in mind --
Starting a film company --
Being in the right company --
Other things to do to set up your company --
Going escrow --
Contracting your investor --
Tapping into alternative sources --
Pre-selling your film --
Getting a grant --
Getting a loan --
Bartering: trade you this for that --
Chapter 6: Location, location, location --
Locating locations --
Managing location scouts and managers --
Evaluating potential locations --
Taking a picture: say "cheese" and "thank you" --
Sounding off about soundstages --
Findings-or creating-a sound stage --
Putting up walls: using flats --
Shooting in the United States or crossing the border? --
Researching U S government incentives --
Traveling to Canada --
Locating stock footage --
Virtual locations: crating new worlds on a computer --
Securing your locations --
Acquiring permits --
Ensuring you're insured --
Mapping out your locations --
Policing your locations --
Fire! --
Shooting second-unit locations --
Chapter 7: Crewing up: hiring your crew --
Something to crew about --
Producing the producer --
Directing the direction --
Stepping over the line producer --
Uniting with a production manager --
Supervising the script --
Directing photography with a cinematographer --
Going with your gaffer --
Getting a grip --
Sounding like your sound mixer --
Booming the sound --
Propping up the prop master --
Dressing up the wardrobe department --
Making up is hard to do --
Gopher this, gopher that --
Keeping your composer --
Editing: cut that out! --
And the rest --
Finding and interviewing your crew --
Creative ways to pay your crew --
Paying later: deferments or points --
Giving 'em credit --
Hiring student bodies --
Paying a kit fee --
Hiring crew as independent contractors --
Union or non-union-that's the question --
Putting a contract out on your crew --
Chapter 8: Assembling your cast of characters --
Hooking your cast and reeling the in --
Calling all agents --
Casting through casting directors --
Placing casting ads --
Calling casting services --
Accessing actor directories --
Screening an actor's information --
Headshots and resumes --
Taping their act --
Spinning an actor's web site --
Auditioning your potential cast --
Creating a friendly environment --
Inspecting an actor's etiquette --
Slating on video --
Avoiding bitter-cold readings --
Monologues leave you all by yourself --
Making the cut: picking your cast --
Calling back --
Screen testing --
And the winners are --
Agreeing with actor's agreements --
Contracting union players --
Contracting non-union players --
Securing releases from extras --
Chapter 9: Storyboarding your film --
Understanding the basics and benefits of storyboarding --
Setting up to storyboard --
Breaking down your script --
Evaluating each shot --
Organizing a shot list --
Framing storyboard panels --
Deciding what to include in each panel: putting pencil to paper --
Choosing the right angles --
Imagining camera and actor movement --
Boarding your special effects --
Sketching out the actors, props, and vehicles --
Looking at lighting and location --
I can't draw, even if my life depended on it --
Designing with storyboard software --
Drawing the help of a professional artist --
Part 3: Ready To Roll: Starting Production On Your Film --
Chapter 10: Shooting through the looking glass --
Choosing the right camera --
Rolling with film cameras --
Recording with digital camcorders --
Do you need glasses? Types of lenses and what they do --
Normal lens --
Chapter 11: Let there be lighting! --
Lighting up your life --
Shedding some light on lighting jargon --
Big foot-candles: lighting for film cameras --
Lux (and cream cheese): lighting for digital (SD and HD) --
Taking your color temperature --
Illuminating with soft light versus hard light --
Chapter 12: Sound advice: production sound --
Testing, testing 1,2,3 --
Assembling a sound team --
Mixing it up with your mixer --
Making room for the boom operator --
Choosing analog or digital sound --
Analog: the sound of nagra falls --
DAT recorders and dat's not all --
In the field with digital recorders --
Recording with microphones --
Shooting with shotgun microphones --
Omni-directional mics --
Lapel microphones --
Wireless microphones --
Using your headphones --
Walking and talking: walkie-talkies on set --
Listening for quiet --
Shushing the camera: Barney hears you --
Silencing footsteps with sound blankets and foot foam --
Getting up to speed safe and sound --
Slating with the clapper board --
Syncing picture and sound with timecode --
Capturing on-set ambience --
Reporting your sound --
Chapter 13: Directing your actors: and action! --
Getting your actors familiar with the material-and each other --
Remembering that familiarity breeds content --
Reading through the script: the table read --
Adjusting dialogue to make it read naturally --
Being a parent and mentor to your actors with no allowance --
Preparing your actors before the shoot --
Rehearsals, yea or nay? --
Rehearing the characters, not just the lines --
Discovering the characters' backstories --
Reading between the lines: subtext --
Exercising and warming up your actors --
Acting is reacting --
Speaking with body language --
Directing actors during the shoot --
Encouraging your actors to ask questions-but not too many --
Reminding your actors that less is more-more or less --
Feeling the words, not just memorizing --
Blocking, walking and talking --
Taking care of business --
Matching actors' actions --
Commending the actors --
Chapter 14: Sense of Direction: Directing Your Film. Focusing on directing --
Directing traits --
Training yourself as a director --
Translating script to screen --
Understanding the screenplay --
Rewriting or adjusting the script --
Visualizing your screenplay --
Mapping out your plans for the camera --
Designing storyboards --
Creating a shot list --
Sketching schematics --
Making notes on the script --
Planning with models (not the high-fashion kind) --
Continuing continuity with your script supervisor --
Got a match? --
Inserting coverage and cutaways --
Screen direction: your other left --
Taking your best shot --
Where the heck are we? Establishing a wide shot --
You don't have to be a psychic to get a medium shot --
Two shot: three's a crowd --
I'm ready for my close-up --
Picture this: deciding when to move the camera and why --
Playing with dollies --
Craning to get a high shot --
Steadying the camera --
Part 4: Finishing your film in post --
Chapter 15: Cut to: editing your film frame by frame --
Editing your film: one frame in front of the other choosing an editor: who cut this? --
Shooting enough coverage --
Assembling a first cut --
Building a director's cut --
Photo finish: finalizing a final cut --
Listening to the sound editor --
Linear versus non-linear editing --Editing in linear --
Editing in non-linear --
Editing on your computer --
Hard driving --
Cutting it with editing software --
Posting your production in your computer --
Outputting formats --
Developing a relationship Your film lab --
Developing negatives, producing prints, and more --
Being positive about a negative cutter --
Color-correcting your film: as plain as black and white --
Answering your first film print --
Cloning, not copying; cloning, not copying --
Chapter 16: Posting your film's soundtrack: adding music & effects to the mix --
Finishing sound in postproduction --
Stirring up the mixer's toolbox --
Mixing the right balance --
Looping the loop --
Creating sound effects with a bang --
Listening to sound-effects libraries --
Creating and recording your own sound effects --
Getting to know Jack Foley --
Adding room tone: ambience or background sounds --
Scoring big with music --
Conducting a composer to set the mood --
Composing your own music --
Sound of music libraries --
Playing with original songs --
Orchestrating the rights to popular music --
Cueing up cue sheets --
Sings songs in the public domain --
Outputting your final mix --
Surrounding sound --
Separating music and effects tracks for foreign release --
Chapter 17: Conjuring up special effects --
Creating effects: in or out of camera? --
Dropping in backgrounds --
Turning blue and green --
Dishing out special-effects plates --
Painting scenery into you shots: matte paintings --
Have you seen scenic backdrops? --
Clipping your magazines --
Weathering the storm --
Downsizing miniatures --
Looking down on miniatures --
Forcing the perspective, forcefully --
Climbing the walls --
Creating effects right in the camera --
Backward about reverse photography --
Double exposure, double exposure --
Speeding slowly --
Creating effects with lenses and filters --
Exploding effects on fire --
Making up you mind about make-up effects --
Applying prosthetics --
Here's looking at scleral lenses --
Take a bite out of this --
Chapter 18: Giving credit and titles --
Titling your film --
Writing a running list of names and positions --
Spelling it write --
Entitled to a credit --
Designing your title and credits --
Designing the style with fonts --
Animating your main title and credits --
Digital or optical credits --
Crediting without a computer --
Rolling your title and credits --
Timing the opening and ending credits --
Ordering your title and credits --
Ensuring the safety of your credits --
Covering your eyes: stripping titles for foreign textless --
Part 5: Finding a distributor for your film --
Chapter 19: Distributing your film --
Understanding how distribution works --
Presenting your film to distributors --
Posting a poster of your film --
Picturing the set photographer --
Pulling your audience in with a trailer --
Premiering your film --
Distributing you film domestically --
Minding media rights --
Anticipating ancillary rights --
Meeting domestic buyers at the home media expo --
Distributing your film around the world --
Selling your film at the super markets --
Negotiating: how much for your film? --
Speaking their language --
Chapter 20: Exploring and entering film festivals --
Demystifying film festivals --
Judging the difference between a film festival and a film market --
Screening the benefits of entering film festivals --
Entering and winning secrets --
Submitting a work-in-progress - don't --
Entering the right festivals for your film --
Choosing the appropriate genre and category --
Writing a great synopsis of your film --
Sending the best format --
Entering without a box --
Getting an entry-fee discount --
Part 6: Part of tens --
Chapter 21: Ten tips for discovering new talent --
Viewing independent films --
Watching local theater --
Attending actors' showcases --
Visiting acting schools --
Talking to agents and managers --
Searching the academy players directory --
Schmoozing at film festivals and markets --
Walking down the street --
Holding talent contests --
Starring your family --
Chapter 22: Ten ways to get publicity for your film --
Submitting a press release --
Doing a TV or radio interview --
Getting a review from movie critics --
Mailing out DVD screeners --
Attending film festivals --
Emailing and setting up a web site --
Designing T-shirts and other premiums --
Planning a publicity stunt --
Organizing a screening party or charity event --
Placing an ad --
Chapter 23: Ten ways to avoid Murphy's Law --
Testing the camera --
Scouting locations for noise --
Watching the weather channel --
Backing up locations and actors --
Using a stunt double --
Standing by with first-aid kit or medic on set --
Anticipating that cell phones and internet don't work everywhere --
Mapping our directions --
Providing plenty of parking --
Securing security overnight --
Powering up ahead of time --
Chapter 24: Ten best filmmaking periodicals --
Hollywood reporter --
Daily variety --
Backstage --
Video maker --
Entertainment weekly --
People magazine --
American cinematographer --
DV magazine --
Moviemaker magazine --
Student filmmakers magazine --
Index.
Series Title: --For dummies
Responsibility: by Bryan Michael Stoller ; foreword by Jerry Lewis.
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Today, the art of filmmaking has been changed due to the ubiquitous nature of High Definition and digital format and the explosion of such sites as YouTube and MySpace that provide another outlet for  Read more...

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rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Motion pictures--Production and direction"@en
schema:name"Motion pictures--Production and direction."@en
schema:bookEdition"2nd ed."
schema:copyrightYear"2009"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2009"
schema:description"Part 4: Finishing your film in post -- Chapter 15: Cut to: editing your film frame by frame -- Editing your film: one frame in front of the other choosing an editor: who cut this? -- Shooting enough coverage -- Assembling a first cut -- Building a director's cut -- Photo finish: finalizing a final cut -- Listening to the sound editor -- Linear versus non-linear editing --Editing in linear -- Editing in non-linear -- Editing on your computer -- Hard driving -- Cutting it with editing software -- Posting your production in your computer -- Outputting formats -- Developing a relationship Your film lab -- Developing negatives, producing prints, and more -- Being positive about a negative cutter -- Color-correcting your film: as plain as black and white -- Answering your first film print -- Cloning, not copying; cloning, not copying -- Chapter 16: Posting your film's soundtrack: adding music & effects to the mix -- Finishing sound in postproduction -- Stirring up the mixer's toolbox -- Mixing the right balance -- Looping the loop -- Creating sound effects with a bang -- Listening to sound-effects libraries -- Creating and recording your own sound effects -- Getting to know Jack Foley -- Adding room tone: ambience or background sounds -- Scoring big with music -- Conducting a composer to set the mood -- Composing your own music -- Sound of music libraries -- Playing with original songs -- Orchestrating the rights to popular music -- Cueing up cue sheets -- Sings songs in the public domain -- Outputting your final mix -- Surrounding sound -- Separating music and effects tracks for foreign release -- Chapter 17: Conjuring up special effects -- Creating effects: in or out of camera? -- Dropping in backgrounds -- Turning blue and green -- Dishing out special-effects plates -- Painting scenery into you shots: matte paintings -- Have you seen scenic backdrops? -- Clipping your magazines -- Weathering the storm -- Downsizing miniatures -- Looking down on miniatures -- Forcing the perspective, forcefully -- Climbing the walls -- Creating effects right in the camera -- Backward about reverse photography -- Double exposure, double exposure -- Speeding slowly -- Creating effects with lenses and filters -- Exploding effects on fire -- Making up you mind about make-up effects -- Applying prosthetics -- Here's looking at scleral lenses -- Take a bite out of this -- Chapter 18: Giving credit and titles -- Titling your film -- Writing a running list of names and positions -- Spelling it write -- Entitled to a credit -- Designing your title and credits -- Designing the style with fonts -- Animating your main title and credits -- Digital or optical credits -- Crediting without a computer -- Rolling your title and credits -- Timing the opening and ending credits -- Ordering your title and credits -- Ensuring the safety of your credits -- Covering your eyes: stripping titles for foreign textless -- Part 5: Finding a distributor for your film -- Chapter 19: Distributing your film -- Understanding how distribution works -- Presenting your film to distributors -- Posting a poster of your film -- Picturing the set photographer -- Pulling your audience in with a trailer -- Premiering your film -- Distributing you film domestically -- Minding media rights -- Anticipating ancillary rights -- Meeting domestic buyers at the home media expo -- Distributing your film around the world -- Selling your film at the super markets -- Negotiating: how much for your film? -- Speaking their language -- Chapter 20: Exploring and entering film festivals -- Demystifying film festivals -- Judging the difference between a film festival and a film market -- Screening the benefits of entering film festivals -- Entering and winning secrets -- Submitting a work-in-progress - don't -- Entering the right festivals for your film -- Choosing the appropriate genre and category -- Writing a great synopsis of your film -- Sending the best format -- Entering without a box -- Getting an entry-fee discount -- Part 6: Part of tens -- Chapter 21: Ten tips for discovering new talent -- Viewing independent films -- Watching local theater -- Attending actors' showcases -- Visiting acting schools -- Talking to agents and managers -- Searching the academy players directory -- Schmoozing at film festivals and markets -- Walking down the street -- Holding talent contests -- Starring your family -- Chapter 22: Ten ways to get publicity for your film -- Submitting a press release -- Doing a TV or radio interview -- Getting a review from movie critics -- Mailing out DVD screeners -- Attending film festivals -- Emailing and setting up a web site -- Designing T-shirts and other premiums -- Planning a publicity stunt -- Organizing a screening party or charity event -- Placing an ad -- Chapter 23: Ten ways to avoid Murphy's Law -- Testing the camera -- Scouting locations for noise -- Watching the weather channel -- Backing up locations and actors -- Using a stunt double -- Standing by with first-aid kit or medic on set -- Anticipating that cell phones and internet don't work everywhere -- Mapping our directions -- Providing plenty of parking -- Securing security overnight -- Powering up ahead of time -- Chapter 24: Ten best filmmaking periodicals -- Hollywood reporter -- Daily variety -- Backstage -- Video maker -- Entertainment weekly -- People magazine -- American cinematographer -- DV magazine -- Moviemaker magazine -- Student filmmakers magazine -- Index."@en
schema:description"Foreword -- Introduction -- About this book -- Conventions used in this book -- What you're not to read -- Foolish assumptions -- How this book is organized -- Part 1: Filmmaking And Storytelling -- Part 2: Gearing up to make your film -- Part 3: Ready to roll: Starting production on your film -- Part 4: Finishing your film in post -- Part 5: Finding a distributor for your film -- Part 6: Part of tens -- Icons used in this book -- Where to go from here -- Part 1: Filmmaking And Storytelling -- Chapter 1: So you want to be a filmmaker -- Independents day versus the Hollywood way -- Filmmaking: traditional or digital? -- Traditional: super-8, 16mm, or 35mm -- Going digital: standard or high-def -- Developing your sense of story -- Financing your film: where's the money -- On a budget: scheduling your shoot -- Planning your shoot, shooting your plan -- Hiring your cast and crewing up -- Shooting in the right direction -- Seeing the light -- Being heard and scene -- Actors taking your direction -- Directing through the camera -- Cut it out! Editing your film -- Listening to your film -- Simulating film with software -- Distributing your film and finding an audience -- Chapter 2: Genres in general -- Exploring film genres -- Making 'em laugh with comedy -- Getting dramatic about it -- Horrifying horror films -- Romancing the romantic -- Getting physical: no talk and all action -- Separating fact from (science) fiction -- Indulging your fantasy -- Go west, young man: Westerns -- Going to war -- Thrilling audiences with suspense -- Stealing the audience's attention: crime pays -- Making music with musicals -- Kidding around: family friendly films -- Categorizing your genres -- Featuring films -- Made-for-TV movie -- Documenting documentaries -- Shooting short films: keep it brief! -- Directing television programs -- Directing commercials -- Minding your PSAs: public service announcements -- Feel like dancing? Music videos -- Industrials: industrial strength -- Chapter 3: Penning and pitching a great story -- Screening for the perfect screenplay -- Write way to find a writer -- Adapting: a novel idea -- Writing your own original screenplay -- Structuring your screenplay -- Creating conflict -- Developing characters -- Drafting your screenplay: scene by scene -- Collaborating with writer's software -- Formatting your screenplay -- Selling your screenplay to a production studio -- Distributor, or investor -- Getting your foot (and screenplay) in the door -- Pitching a home run -- Part 2: Gearing Up to Make Your Film -- Chapter 4: Scheduling and budgeting your film -- Art of scheduling a film -- Lining your script -- Breaking into breakdown sheets -- Creating production strips -- Stripping down your schedule -- Scheduling software to make your life easier -- Balancing your film budget -- Tightrope walking above the line -- Handing below the line -- Topping your budget -- Budgeting for budget software -- Factoring in a contingency amount -- Insurance is your best policy -- Finding an insurance broker -- Bond, completion bond -- Chapter 5: Financing your film -- Creating an enticing prospectus -- Synopsis of your film -- Information about you -- Info about your cast and crew -- Your budget and profit projections -- Investigating investors -- Locating potential investors: show me the money! -- Approaching a potential investor -- Keeping the securities and exchange commission in mind -- Starting a film company -- Being in the right company -- Other things to do to set up your company -- Going escrow -- Contracting your investor -- Tapping into alternative sources -- Pre-selling your film -- Getting a grant -- Getting a loan -- Bartering: trade you this for that -- Chapter 6: Location, location, location -- Locating locations -- Managing location scouts and managers -- Evaluating potential locations -- Taking a picture: say "cheese" and "thank you" -- Sounding off about soundstages -- Findings-or creating-a sound stage -- Putting up walls: using flats -- Shooting in the United States or crossing the border? -- Researching U S government incentives -- Traveling to Canada -- Locating stock footage -- Virtual locations: crating new worlds on a computer -- Securing your locations -- Acquiring permits -- Ensuring you're insured -- Mapping out your locations -- Policing your locations -- Fire! -- Shooting second-unit locations --"@en
schema:description"Chapter 7: Crewing up: hiring your crew -- Something to crew about -- Producing the producer -- Directing the direction -- Stepping over the line producer -- Uniting with a production manager -- Supervising the script -- Directing photography with a cinematographer -- Going with your gaffer -- Getting a grip -- Sounding like your sound mixer -- Booming the sound -- Propping up the prop master -- Dressing up the wardrobe department -- Making up is hard to do -- Gopher this, gopher that -- Keeping your composer -- Editing: cut that out! -- And the rest -- Finding and interviewing your crew -- Creative ways to pay your crew -- Paying later: deferments or points -- Giving 'em credit -- Hiring student bodies -- Paying a kit fee -- Hiring crew as independent contractors -- Union or non-union-that's the question -- Putting a contract out on your crew -- Chapter 8: Assembling your cast of characters -- Hooking your cast and reeling the in -- Calling all agents -- Casting through casting directors -- Placing casting ads -- Calling casting services -- Accessing actor directories -- Screening an actor's information -- Headshots and resumes -- Taping their act -- Spinning an actor's web site -- Auditioning your potential cast -- Creating a friendly environment -- Inspecting an actor's etiquette -- Slating on video -- Avoiding bitter-cold readings -- Monologues leave you all by yourself -- Making the cut: picking your cast -- Calling back -- Screen testing -- And the winners are -- Agreeing with actor's agreements -- Contracting union players -- Contracting non-union players -- Securing releases from extras -- Chapter 9: Storyboarding your film -- Understanding the basics and benefits of storyboarding -- Setting up to storyboard -- Breaking down your script -- Evaluating each shot -- Organizing a shot list -- Framing storyboard panels -- Deciding what to include in each panel: putting pencil to paper -- Choosing the right angles -- Imagining camera and actor movement -- Boarding your special effects -- Sketching out the actors, props, and vehicles -- Looking at lighting and location -- I can't draw, even if my life depended on it -- Designing with storyboard software -- Drawing the help of a professional artist -- Part 3: Ready To Roll: Starting Production On Your Film -- Chapter 10: Shooting through the looking glass -- Choosing the right camera -- Rolling with film cameras -- Recording with digital camcorders -- Do you need glasses? Types of lenses and what they do -- Normal lens -- Chapter 11: Let there be lighting! -- Lighting up your life -- Shedding some light on lighting jargon -- Big foot-candles: lighting for film cameras -- Lux (and cream cheese): lighting for digital (SD and HD) -- Taking your color temperature -- Illuminating with soft light versus hard light -- Chapter 12: Sound advice: production sound -- Testing, testing 1,2,3 -- Assembling a sound team -- Mixing it up with your mixer -- Making room for the boom operator -- Choosing analog or digital sound -- Analog: the sound of nagra falls -- DAT recorders and dat's not all -- In the field with digital recorders -- Recording with microphones -- Shooting with shotgun microphones -- Omni-directional mics -- Lapel microphones -- Wireless microphones -- Using your headphones -- Walking and talking: walkie-talkies on set -- Listening for quiet -- Shushing the camera: Barney hears you -- Silencing footsteps with sound blankets and foot foam -- Getting up to speed safe and sound -- Slating with the clapper board -- Syncing picture and sound with timecode -- Capturing on-set ambience -- Reporting your sound -- Chapter 13: Directing your actors: and action! -- Getting your actors familiar with the material-and each other -- Remembering that familiarity breeds content -- Reading through the script: the table read -- Adjusting dialogue to make it read naturally -- Being a parent and mentor to your actors with no allowance -- Preparing your actors before the shoot -- Rehearsals, yea or nay? -- Rehearing the characters, not just the lines -- Discovering the characters' backstories -- Reading between the lines: subtext -- Exercising and warming up your actors -- Acting is reacting -- Speaking with body language -- Directing actors during the shoot -- Encouraging your actors to ask questions-but not too many -- Reminding your actors that less is more-more or less -- Feeling the words, not just memorizing -- Blocking, walking and talking -- Taking care of business -- Matching actors' actions -- Commending the actors -- Chapter 14: Sense of Direction: Directing Your Film. Focusing on directing -- Directing traits -- Training yourself as a director -- Translating script to screen -- Understanding the screenplay -- Rewriting or adjusting the script -- Visualizing your screenplay -- Mapping out your plans for the camera -- Designing storyboards -- Creating a shot list -- Sketching schematics -- Making notes on the script -- Planning with models (not the high-fashion kind) -- Continuing continuity with your script supervisor -- Got a match? -- Inserting coverage and cutaways -- Screen direction: your other left -- Taking your best shot -- Where the heck are we? Establishing a wide shot -- You don't have to be a psychic to get a medium shot -- Two shot: three's a crowd -- I'm ready for my close-up -- Picture this: deciding when to move the camera and why -- Playing with dollies -- Craning to get a high shot -- Steadying the camera --"@en
schema:description"Synopsis: Now updated the step by step secrets to capturing great moments on film. With all the recent advancements in filmmaking technology, more people than ever are trying their hand at filmmaking. Keeping up with the newest information in this booming field, this updated edition of Filmmaking For Dummies features up-to-the-minute coverage of the latest and greatest hardware, software, accessories, and trends including high-definition technology and new outlets for films such as YouTube and MySpace. It demystifies the nuts-and-bolts of filmmaking, from developing a project and securing financing to hiring a cast and crew, editing, and getting distribution. This new edition also provides new movie examples and updated contacts and resources. Whether people want to become professional filmmakers or simply shoot quality home movies, this practical guide has all the advice and tips needed to succeed."@en
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schema:name"Filmmaking for dummies"@en
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