skip to content
The fire next door : Mexico's drug violence and the danger to America Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

The fire next door : Mexico's drug violence and the danger to America

Author: Ted Galen Carpenter
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Cato Institute, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Since Mexican President Felipe Calderón initiated a military offensive against his country's powerful drug cartels in December 2006, some 44,000 people have perished, and the drugs continue to flow. The growing violence has created concerns that Mexico could become a failed state, as United States political leaders also worry that the corruption and violence is seeping across the border into the US. But, as  Read more...
You are not connected to the University of South Dakota network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Off-Campus Log-in
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Ted Galen Carpenter
ISBN: 9781935308881 1935308882
OCLC Number: 785865431
Description: xiv, 307 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Cast of characters: the Mexican drug cartels and their leaders: The traffickers and their groupies ; Rogues and psychopaths? ; The principal cartels: and ever-changing roster ; The weirdest group: La familia ; Beyond gangs: sophisticated business enterprises --
Calderón's war and the surge of casualties: Tragedy in Tijuana ; Epicenter of the violence: Ciudad Juárez ; Prelude to the Juárez Turmoil: Nuevo Laredo ; The multi-sided war ; Sadism run amok ; Drug terrorism in the digital age ; A spreading plague --
Carnage in Mexico: the innocent victims: Civilians who run afoul of the cartels ; Attacks on the news media ; The Catholic Church: a new target? ; Just being in the wrong place at the wrong time --
"Silver or lead?": the sources of the cartel's power: The political clout of the cartels ; The "Silver or Lead?" dilemma ; Pervasive official corruption ; The cartels as major economic players ; Using the stick --
Mexico: a new failed state?: No region is truly safe ; Rising fear and its economic impact ; Refugees fleeing the chaos ; Signs of vigilantes ; The military and human-rights abuses ; The corroding Mexican state. Calderón's strategy: a failing grade: Calderón: Elliot Ness or Ambrose Burnside? ; The decapitation strategy ; War Weariness ; Calderón: No surrender! ; No real change in strategy ; Spreading the problem to Mexico's neighbors ; Mexico's drug war after Calderón --
Mexico's corruption and violence: a threat to Americans?: The growing Mexican cartel presence in the United States ; Corruption migrating north of the border ; Dangers to Americans in Mexico ; Violence spilling over the border: myth or realty? ; A climate of fear --
Washington's own war on the cartels: The Mérida initiative ; A glimpse into a troubling reality: the WikiLeaks documents ; Washington's expanding role south of the Rio Grande ; Counterpoint: Greater U.S. tolerance for Mexico's drug policy reforms ; Washington's offensive against the cartels in the United States --
Scapegoats and bogus solutions: Scapegoat: lax U.S. gun laws ; Bogus solution: seal the border ; Bogus solution: drastically reduce demand for illegal drugs in the United States --
Biting the bullet: defunding the cartels: Colombia: model or illusion? ; Is an appeasement policy feasible in Mexico? ; Other "Band-Aid" solutions ; The legalization model snare or solution? ; Warning support around the world for the war on drugs ; Changing attitudes in the United States regarding drug policy ; Biting the bullet and helping our neighbor.
Responsibility: Ted Galen Carpenter.

Abstract:

Since Mexican President Felipe Calderón initiated a military offensive against his country's powerful drug cartels in December 2006, some 44,000 people have perished, and the drugs continue to flow. The growing violence has created concerns that Mexico could become a failed state, as United States political leaders also worry that the corruption and violence is seeping across the border into the US. But, as detailed by the author, the current US-backed strategies for trying to stem Mexico's drug violence have been a disaster. Carpenter details the growing horror overtaking Mexico and makes the case that the only effective strategy is to de-fund the Mexican drug cartels. Boldly conveyed here, such a blow requires the US, the principal consumer market for illegal drugs, to abandon its failed drug prohibition policy, thereby eliminating the lucrative black-market premium and greatly reducing the financial resources of drug cartels. A refusal to renounce prohibition means that Mexico's agony will likely worsen and pose even more significant problems for the US.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.