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The fireproof building : technology and public safety in the nineteenth-century American city

Author: Sara E Wermiel
Publisher: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, ©2000.
Series: Studies in industry and society.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The Fireproof Building traces the development of structural fire protection in America and its important consequences for building construction as well as for the safety of cities. Urban conflagrations destroyed many downtowns in the nineteenth century. To protect their property, some owners made their buildings fire-resistive - or as they were called in the past, fireproof - by using new kinds of noncombustible  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Wermiel, Sara E.
Fireproof building.
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, ©2000
(OCoLC)746975660
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Sara E Wermiel
ISBN: 0801863112 9780801863110
OCLC Number: 42692096
Description: viii, 301 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction: Solving the Problem of Urban Conflagration --
1. The Solid Masonry Fireproof Building, 1790-1840 --
2. The Iron and Brick Fireproof Building, 1840-1860 --
3. Response to the Great Fires: Experimentation in the 1860s to the Early 1880s --
4. Mill Fire Protection Methods Enter the Mainstream --
5. Triumph: The Fireproof Skyscraper --
6. Calamity: Slow Acceptance of Adequate Fire Exits --
Conclusion: The Invisible Infrastructure of Safety.
Series Title: Studies in industry and society.
Responsibility: Sara E. Wermiel.
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Abstract:

The author explores the work of the pioneers of structural fire protection, such as architect Peter B. Wight. She explains when and why the materials of fire construction came into use and shows the  Read more...

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"In thoroughly examining the technological and legal aspects of fireproof construction, Wermiel's work illuminates the history of architecture, engineering, business, and insurance, and American Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""The Fireproof Building traces the development of structural fire protection in America and its important consequences for building construction as well as for the safety of cities. Urban conflagrations destroyed many downtowns in the nineteenth century. To protect their property, some owners made their buildings fire-resistive - or as they were called in the past, fireproof - by using new kinds of noncombustible materials and arranging the space inside to check the spread of fire. As these methods improved and owners replaced combustible buildings with fireproof ones, urban firestorms became a thing of the past."--Jacket."
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