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The first four notes : Beethoven's fifth and the human imagination

Author: Matthew Guerrieri
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
A unique and revelatory book of music history that examines in great depth what is perhaps the best-known and most-popular symphony ever written and its four-note opening, which has fascinated musicians, historians, and philosophers for the last two hundred years. Music critic Matthew Guerrieri reaches back before Beethoven's time to examine what might have influenced him in writing his Fifth Symphony, and forward  Read more...
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Named Person: Ludwig van Beethoven; Ludwig van Beethoven; Ludwig van Beethoven; Ludwig van Beethoven
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Matthew Guerrieri
ISBN: 9780307593283 0307593282
OCLC Number: 769425355
Description: xiii, 359 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Revolutions --
Fates --
Infinities --
Associations --
Secret remedies --
Earthquakes --
Samples.
Responsibility: by Matthew Guerrieri.

Abstract:

A unique and revelatory book of music history that examines in great depth what is perhaps the best-known and most-popular symphony ever written and its four-note opening, which has fascinated musicians, historians, and philosophers for the last two hundred years. Music critic Matthew Guerrieri reaches back before Beethoven's time to examine what might have influenced him in writing his Fifth Symphony, and forward into our own time to describe the ways in which the Fifth has, in turn, asserted its influence. He uncovers possible sources for the famous opening notes in the rhythms of ancient Greek poetry and certain French Revolutionary songs and symphonies. Guerrieri confirms that, contrary to popular belief, Beethoven was not deaf when he wrote the Fifth. He traces the Fifth's influence in China, Russia, and the United States (Emerson and Thoreau were passionate fans) and shows how the masterpiece was used by both the Allies and the Nazis in World War II. Altogether, a fascinating piece of musical detective work--a treat for music lovers of every stripe [Publisher description]

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