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First steps in the Talmud : a guide to the confused

Author: Jacob Neusner
Publisher: Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, ©2011.
Series: Studies in Judaism.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The Talmud is a confusing piece of writing. It begins no where and ends no where but it does not move in a circle. It is written in several languages and follows rules that in certain circumstances trigger the use of one language over others. Its components are diverse. To translating it requires elaborate complementary language. It cannot be translated verbatim into any language. So a translation is a commentary  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Introductions
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Neusner, Jacob, 1932-
First steps in the Talmud.
Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c2011
(DLC) 2010938994
(OCoLC)681481554
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jacob Neusner
ISBN: 9780761854364 0761854363
OCLC Number: 812275677
Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 198 p.)
Contents: How many languages does the Talmud need? --
Translating rabbinic documents --
The Talmud's primary discourse --
Who speaks through the Bavli? --
The Talmud's massive miscellanies --
The law behind the laws.
Series Title: Studies in Judaism.
Responsibility: Jacob Neusner.

Abstract:

"The Talmud is a confusing piece of writing. It begins no where and ends no where but it does not move in a circle. It is written in several languages and follows rules that in certain circumstances trigger the use of one language over others. Its components are diverse. To translating it requires elaborate complementary language. It cannot be translated verbatim into any language. So a translation is a commentary in the most decisive way. The Talmud, accordingly, cannot be merely read but only studied. It contains diverse programs of writing, some descriptive and some analytical. A large segment of the writing follows a clear pattern, but the document encompasses vast components of miscellaneous collections of bits and pieces, odds and ends. It is a mishmash and a mess. Yet it defines the program of study of the community of Judaism and governs the articulation of the norms and laws of Judaism, its theology and its hermeneutics. Above all else, the Talmud of Babylonia is comprised of contention and produces conflict and disagreement, with little effort at a resolution No wonder the Talmud confuses its audience. But that does not explain the power of the Talmud to define Judaism and shape its intellect. This book guides those puzzled by the Talmud and shows the system and order that animate the text"--Back cover.

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