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The first to cry down injustice? : Western Jews and Japanese removal during WWII

Author: Ellen Eisenberg
Publisher: Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This volume analyzes the range of responses from Jews on the Pacific West to the removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. While it is often assumed that American Jews because of a commitment to fighting prejudice would have taken a position against this discriminatory policy, the treatment of Japanese Americans was largely ignored by national Jewish groups and liberal groups. For those on the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Ellen Eisenberg
ISBN: 9780739113813 073911381X 9780739113820 0739113828
OCLC Number: 228676726
Description: xxi, 181 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Western Jews, whiteness, and the Asian "other" --
A studious silence: Western Jewish responses to Japanese removal --
To be the first to cry down injustice? Western Jews and opposition to Nikkei policy --
Fighting fascism: the LAJCC and the case for removal.
Responsibility: Ellen M. Eisenberg.
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Abstract:

This volume analyzes the range of responses from Jews on the Pacific West to the removal and incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII. While it is often assumed that American Jews because of a commitment to fighting prejudice would have taken a position against this discriminatory policy, the treatment of Japanese Americans was largely ignored by national Jewish groups and liberal groups. For those on the West Coast, however, proximity to the evacuation made it difficult to ignore. Conflicting impulses on the issue and the desire to speak out against discrimination on the one hand, but to support a critical wartime policy on the other led most western Jewish organizations and community newspapers to remain tensely silent. Some Jewish leaders did speak out against the policy because of personal relationships with Japanese Americans and political convictions. The author places these varied responses into the larger context of the western ethnic landscape and argues that they were linked to, and help to illuminate, the identity of western Jews both as westerners and as Jews.

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While numerous scholars have noted that American Jews and their organizations were largely absent from the small minority which protested the disgraceful treatment of Japanese Americans during World Read more...

 
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