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For all the world to see : visual culture and the struggle for civil rights

Author: Maurice Berger; International Center of Photography.
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In 1955, shortly after Emmett Till was murdered by white supremacists in Mississippi, his grieving mother distributed to the press a gruesome photograph of his mutilated corpse. Asked why she would do this, she explained that by witnessing with their own eyes the brutality of segregation and racism, Americans would be more likely to support the cause of racial justice. "Let the world see what I've seen," was her  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Art
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Berger, Maurice, 1956-
For all the world to see.
New Haven : Yale University Press, ©2010
(OCoLC)743503390
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Maurice Berger; International Center of Photography.
ISBN: 9780300121315 0300121318
OCLC Number: 449853655
Notes: "In collaboration with: Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture, University of Maryland Baltimore County, National Museum of African American History and Culture, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C."
Related exhibition held at the International Center of Photography, New York, May 21-Sept. 12, 2010.
Description: xv, 207 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Contents: Foreword / by Thulani Davis --
Introduction : weapons of choice --
It keeps on rollin' along : the status quo --
The new "new Negro" : the culture of positive images --
Plates --
"Let the world see what I've seen" : evidence and persuasion --
Guess who's coming to dinner : broadcasting race --
Epilogue : in our lives we are whole : the pictures of everyday life.
Responsibility: Maurice Berger ; foreword by Thulani Davis.

Abstract:

Examines the ways images mattered in the struggle, and investigates various media including photography, television, film, magazines, newspapers, and advertising. This book allows us to see and  Read more...

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Winner of the 2010 Outstanding Exhibition in a University Art Museum, given by the Association of Art Museum Curators--Outstanding Exhibition in a University Art Museum"Association of Art Museum Read more...

 
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