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For the freedom of her race : Black women and electoral politics in Illinois, 1877-1932

Author: Lisa G Materson
Publisher: Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, ©2009.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Focusing on Chicago and downstate Illinois politics during the incredibly oppressive decades between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932 - a period that is often described as the nadir of black life in America - Lisa Materson illuminates the impact that migrating southern black women had on midwestern and national politics, first in the Republican Party and later  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lisa G Materson
ISBN: 9780807832714 0807832715 9781469600895 1469600897
OCLC Number: 244354517
Description: xv, 344 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
Contents: Tomorrow you will go to the polls : women's voting in Chicago in 1894 --
Because her parents had never had the chance : southern migrant politics during the 1910s --
Profit from the mistakes of men : national party politics, 1920-1924 --
The prohibition issue as a smoke screen : the failure of racial uplift ideology and the 1928 election --
Political reconstruction for themselves and their daughters : the campaigns of Ruth Hanna McCormick, 1927-1930.
Responsibility: Lisa G. Materson.
More information:

Abstract:

"Focusing on Chicago and downstate Illinois politics during the incredibly oppressive decades between the end of Reconstruction in 1877 and the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1932 - a period that is often described as the nadir of black life in America - Lisa Materson illuminates the impact that migrating southern black women had on midwestern and national politics, first in the Republican Party and later in the Democratic Party." "Materson shows that as African American women migrated beyond the reach of southern white supremacists, they became active voters, canvassers, suffragists, campaigners, and lobbyists, mobilizing to elect representatives who would push for the enforcement of the Reconstruction Amendments in the South. In so doing, black women kept alive a very distinct strain of Republican Party ideology that favored using federal power to protect black citizenship rights. Materson also examines the Republican failure to enact antilynching legislation, which began the move of black women toward the Democrats, and she discusses women's embrace of the Democratic Party with the election of FDR in 1932." "For the Freedom of Her Race is an important contribution to the story of African American women's role in electoral politics in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, illuminating questions about voting rights, electoral organization, and the struggles for racial and gender equality in the United States." --Book Jacket.

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Linked Data


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