passa ai contenuti
For the sake of our Japanese brethren : assimilation, nationalism, and Protestantism among the Japanese of Los Angeles, 1895-1942 Anteprima di questo documento
ChiudiAnteprima di questo documento
Stiamo controllando…

For the sake of our Japanese brethren : assimilation, nationalism, and Protestantism among the Japanese of Los Angeles, 1895-1942

Autore: Brian Masaru Hayashi
Editore: Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1995.
Serie: Asian America.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
Japanese Americans in general and Protestant Japanese Americans in particular are usually described as models of cultural assimilation to American life. This book paints a much more complex picture of the Japanese American community in Los Angeles (the largest in the continental United States in the years before World War II), in the process showing that before Pearl Harbor, the primary allegiance of many Japanese  Per saperne di più…
Voto:

(non ancora votato) 0 con commenti - Diventa il primo.

Soggetti
Altri come questo

 

Trova una copia in biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Stiamo ricercando le biblioteche che possiedono questo documento…

Dettagli

Genere/forma: Church history
History
Tipo materiale: Risorsa internet
Tipo documento: Book, Internet Resource
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Brian Masaru Hayashi
ISBN: 0804723745 9780804723749
Numero OCLC: 30543880
Note: Based on the author's thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Los Angeles.
Descrizione: xvi, 217 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Titolo della serie: Asian America.
Responsabilità: Brian Masaru Hayashi.
Maggiori informazioni:

Abstract:

Japanese Americans in general and Protestant Japanese Americans in particular are usually described as models of cultural assimilation to American life. This book paints a much more complex picture of the Japanese American community in Los Angeles (the largest in the continental United States in the years before World War II), in the process showing that before Pearl Harbor, the primary allegiance of many Japanese Americans was to Japan. The author argues, on the basis of previously unused archives of three Japanese Protestant churches spanning almost a half century that Protestantism did not accelerate assimilation, and that there was not an extensive assimilation process under way in the prewar years. He suggests that what has been seen as evidence of assimilation (e.g., the learning of English) may have meant something very different to the people in question (e.g., a demonstration of the superior learning abilities of the Japanese). The book shows that among both first- and second-generation Japanese immigrants, there was a strong shift from assimilationist aspirations in the 1920's to nationalistic identification with Japan in the 1930's, a shift that was in some ways fostered by a growing adherence to evangelical Protestantism. The first chapter, set in 1942, describes how the Protestant Japanese Americans in internment camps were divided into pro- and anti-United States factions. The reason for this division is found in their prewar experiences, as shown in the subsequent chapters devoted to historical background, socioeconomic conditions, types of social organization, the ideology of Issei (first-generation) males, the influence of Issei women, the ambivalent world of Nisei (second-generation) children, and the place of the Protestants in the larger, non-Protestant Japanese American community.

Commenti

Commenti degli utenti
Recuperando commenti GoodReads…
Stiamo recuperando commenti DOGObooks

Etichette

Diventa il primo.
Conferma questa richiesta

Potresti aver già richiesto questo documento. Seleziona OK se si vuole procedere comunque con questa richiesta.

Dati collegati


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/30543880>
library:oclcnum"30543880"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/30543880>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Assimilation (Soziologie)"
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Américains d'origine japonaise--Californie (États-Unis)--Los Angeles."
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Los Angeles (Calif.)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Los Angeles (Calif.)"
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Églises protestantes--Californie (États-Unis)--Los Angeles--Histoire."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Los Angeles (Calif.)"
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Los Angeles (Calif.)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Américains d'origine japonaise--Californie (États-Unis)--Los Angeles--Religion."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Los Angeles (Calif.)"
schema:author
schema:datePublished"1995"
schema:description"Japanese Americans in general and Protestant Japanese Americans in particular are usually described as models of cultural assimilation to American life. This book paints a much more complex picture of the Japanese American community in Los Angeles (the largest in the continental United States in the years before World War II), in the process showing that before Pearl Harbor, the primary allegiance of many Japanese Americans was to Japan. The author argues, on the basis of previously unused archives of three Japanese Protestant churches spanning almost a half century that Protestantism did not accelerate assimilation, and that there was not an extensive assimilation process under way in the prewar years. He suggests that what has been seen as evidence of assimilation (e.g., the learning of English) may have meant something very different to the people in question (e.g., a demonstration of the superior learning abilities of the Japanese). The book shows that among both first- and second-generation Japanese immigrants, there was a strong shift from assimilationist aspirations in the 1920's to nationalistic identification with Japan in the 1930's, a shift that was in some ways fostered by a growing adherence to evangelical Protestantism. The first chapter, set in 1942, describes how the Protestant Japanese Americans in internment camps were divided into pro- and anti-United States factions. The reason for this division is found in their prewar experiences, as shown in the subsequent chapters devoted to historical background, socioeconomic conditions, types of social organization, the ideology of Issei (first-generation) males, the influence of Issei women, the ambivalent world of Nisei (second-generation) children, and the place of the Protestants in the larger, non-Protestant Japanese American community."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/24478280>
schema:genre"History."
schema:genre"Church history."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"For the sake of our Japanese brethren : assimilation, nationalism, and Protestantism among the Japanese of Los Angeles, 1895-1942"
schema:numberOfPages"217"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Stanford University Press"
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Chiudi finestra

Per favore entra in WorldCat 

Non hai un account? Puoi facilmente crearne uno gratuito.