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Forge of union, anvil of liberty : a correspondent's report on the first federal elections, the first federal Congress, and the Bill of Rights

Author: Jeffrey St John
Publisher: Ottawa, Ill. : Jameson Books ; Lanham, MD : Distributed to the Book trade by National Book Network, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
One of the most important news stories of the last two centuries comes to life in this "eyewitness account" of America's first Federal elections and of the First Congress and President Washington creating the Bill of Rights. In this swift-moving and colorful chronicle, written by St. John as though he were an on-the-scene reporter, you will discover how Congressman James Madison became in the formative months of the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
St. John, Jeffrey.
Forge of union, anvil of liberty.
Ottawa, Ill. : Jameson Books ; Lanham, MD : Distributed to the Book trade by National Book Network, ©1992
(OCoLC)645799571
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jeffrey St John
ISBN: 0915463628 9780915463626
OCLC Number: 25412502
Description: xxx, 288 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: Foreword / Warren E. Burger --
Monthly reports. 1. July 4, 1788: pageant marks independence; federalists eye elections. 2. July 5-31, 1788: attack on powers to tax seen as conspiracy to destroy constitution. 3. August 1788: secret Spanish designs on Kentucky frontier disclosed. 4. September 1788: old congress expires with passage of election ordinance. 5. October 1788: New England vice president eyed as running mate for Washington. 6. November 1788: Washington and Madison suffer defeat at hands of Henry. 7. December 1788: second convention idea sinks beneath wave of federalist wins. 8. January 1789: Washington will accept presidency; electors chosen in ten states. 9. February 1789: Washington and Adams elected; Madison wins house seat. 10. March 1789: new congress convenes; snow and ice delay start. 11. April 1-20, 1789: congress begins business; Adams sworn in as vice president. 12. April 14-29, 1789: wild New York crowds hail Washington at end of seven-day triumphal tour north. 13. April 30, 1789: Washington takes oath; urges reliance on providence and people. 14. May 1789: foreign plots worry Washington; Bill of rights burning issue. 15. June 1789: surgery saves life of president; senate challenges appointment power. 16. July 1789: President Washington wears uniform; military marks Independence Day. 17. August 1789: house approves Bill of rights; president gives priority to Indian problem. 18. September 1789: successful first congress adjourns; Paris mobs imperil French monarchy. 19. October 1789: Washington tours New England; secret opening to England sought. 20. November 1789: North Carolina joins union; Bill of rights stalled in Virginia. 21. December 1789: Paris mobs directed by agitators; French royal family hostages. 22. January 1799: a reporter's reflections --
App. 1. The Constitution of the United States, 1787 --
App. 2. The Bill of rights, December 15, 1791 --
App. 3. Amendments to the constitution, 1798-1971 --
App. 4. Amendments to the constitution sent to the states for ratification --
App. 5. House resolution and articles of amendment, August 24, 1789 --
App. 6. Amendments proposed by the states, June 8, 1789.
Responsibility: Jeffrey St. John ; foreword by Warren E. Burger.

Abstract:

One of the most important news stories of the last two centuries comes to life in this "eyewitness account" of America's first Federal elections and of the First Congress and President Washington creating the Bill of Rights. In this swift-moving and colorful chronicle, written by St. John as though he were an on-the-scene reporter, you will discover how Congressman James Madison became in the formative months of the new Republic the power behind Washington in the executive branch--while wheeling and dealing in Congress, and still championing a separation of powers; how Madison had to fight both friend and foe of the Constitution to pass a Federal Bill of Rights in the First Congress; why Washington and Madison saw the future of America in the frontier West and not in Europe; and how Spanish and British intrigues, with the aid of hostile Indian tribes on the American frontier, posed a threat to the survival of the new national government. Retired Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Warren E. Burger said, "this book, like the first two of St. John's trilogy, tells an exciting story of our nation's founding, which should engage readers of all ages and backgrounds." This book and its predecessors are a captivating history lesson--told like a banner headline news story--for Americans wanting to know the roots of the political freedoms they enjoy today.

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