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The four dimensions of philosophy : metaphysical, moral, objective, categorical

Author: Mortimer Jerome Adler
Publisher: New York : Macmillan Pub. Co. ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Greek and Roman antiquity, philosophy was supreme in the domain of learning. Philosophy was the name for the pursuit of truth about the most fundamental things to be known or understood. It was the most desirable of all the goods of the mind. But today we live in an age dominated by science and technology - an age that has witnessed not only the rise of positivism, but the retreat of academic philosophy to an
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Adler, Mortimer Jerome, 1902-2001.
Four dimensions of philosophy.
New York : Macmillan Pub. Co. ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1993
(OCoLC)654402214
Named Person: Mortimer Jerome Adler; Mortimer Jerome Adler
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Mortimer Jerome Adler
ISBN: 002500574X 9780025005747
OCLC Number: 27034741
Description: xxvii, 273 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: Prologue Everybody's Business --
pt. 1. The Conditions of Philosophy: A Recapitulation. 1. An Autonomous Branch of Knowledge. 2. Diverse Modes of Inquiry. 3. First and Second Intentions. 4. Presuppositions. 5. Tests of Truth in Philosophy. 6. Philosophy and Common Sense. 7. Science and Philosophy --
pt. 2. Philosophical Knowledge: The First Two Dimensions. 8. Regarding Philosophical Knowledge. 9. Metaphysics: What There Is in Reality. 10. Moral and Political Philosophy: The Good Life and the Good Society --
pt. 3. Philosophical Analysis: The Third and Fourth Dimensions. 11. Regarding Philosophical Analysis. 12. The Understanding of Ideas. 13. The Understanding of Subjects --
Epilogue Philosophy's Past, Present, and Future.
Other Titles: 4 dimensions of philosophy.
Responsibility: Mortimer J. Adler.
More information:

Abstract:

In Greek and Roman antiquity, philosophy was supreme in the domain of learning. Philosophy was the name for the pursuit of truth about the most fundamental things to be known or understood. It was the most desirable of all the goods of the mind. But today we live in an age dominated by science and technology - an age that has witnessed not only the rise of positivism, but the retreat of academic philosophy to an analysis of language. Professorial philosophy has become as specialized a subject as logic and mathematics. If anyone asks why we should be concerned with the intellectual respectability of philosophy, this book provides the answer.

Try to imagine a world from which philosophy is totally absent. Imagine a world in which no one philosophizes to any degree - that done almost unconsciously by ordinary men and women or inexpertly by scientists, historians, poets, novelists, and dramatists. Imagine a world in which philosophy is completely expunged. Philosophy is not taught, even poorly in our colleges. No philosophical books are written. In the Prologue to this book, Dr. Adler asks us to consider whether that deprivation would make any difference to us. Though we might not realize it, a great many of our opinions and beliefs would go unquestioned; for any enlightenment about those beliefs can come only from philosophizing about them, about the shape of the world and our place in it: questions about what we should be doing and what we should be seeking; questions that are not answerable by empirical science and historical research.

What, then, are philosophy's four dimensions? Science gives us only partial knowledge and superficial understanding of the reality about which philosophy gives us a more penetrating analysis and a deeper understanding (Dimension One). Science gives us no knowledge or understanding of the good life and the good society. This moral and political philosophy gives us Dimension Two. Science gives us no understanding at all of the intelligible objects of thought - the great ideas (Dimension Three). It does not even enable us to understand science and history. This requires a philosophical understanding of all the intellectual disciplines and branches of learning (Dimension Four). The Four Dimensions of Philosophy not only explains why philosophy must be revived in the coming century, but it also throws light on what must be done to revive it, by overcoming all the obstacles to be found in philosophy's long past.

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