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The fourteenth day : JFK and the aftermath of the Cuban Missile Crisis

Author: David G Coleman
Publisher: New York : W.W. Norton & Co., ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
On October 28, 1962, Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev agreed to remove nuclear missiles from Cuba. Conventional wisdom has marked that day as the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis, a seminal moment in American history. As President Kennedy's secretly recorded White House tapes now reveal, the reality was not so simple. Nuclear missiles were still in Cuba, as were nuclear bombers, short-range missiles, and thousands of  Read more...
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Named Person: John F Kennedy; Nikita Sergeevich Khrushchev; John F Kennedy; Nikita Sergeevich Khrushchev
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David G Coleman
ISBN: 9780393084412 0393084418
OCLC Number: 783161064
Description: 256 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: The ultimate source of action --
The fourteenth day --
Eyes in the sky --
The postmortem season --
Mockingbird don't sing --
The bomber problem --
Standing in judgment --
A tub of butter --
The military problem --
The missiles we've had on our minds --
A deal --
With one voice --
Missiles of November --
Removing the straitjacket --
A political firefight --
Shaping the future.
Responsibility: David G. Coleman.

Abstract:

A fly-on-the-wall narrative of the Oval Office in the wake of the Cuban Missile Crisis, using JFK 's secret White House tapes.  Read more...

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An engrossing and revealing account Coleman has provided an excellent analysis of both short and long term results of the crisis. "

 
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