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The fourth part of the world : the race to the ends of the Earth, and the epic story of the map that gave America its name

著者: Toby Lester
出版商: New York : Free Press, 2009
版本/格式:   图书 : 传记 : 英语 : 1st Free Press hardcover ed查看所有的版本和格式
数据库:WorldCat
提要:
This book, a chronicle of the early sixteenth century creation of the Waldseemuller map offers insight into how monks, classicists, merchants, and other contributors from earlier periods shaped the map's creation. "Old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, Waldseemuller world map of 1507." So begins this remarkable story of the  再读一些...
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详细书目

类型/形式: History
提及的人: Martin Waldseemüller; Matthew Paris; Marco Polo; Martin Waldseemüller; Matthaeus, Parisiensis.; Martin Waldseemüller; Matthew Paris; Marco Polo; Martin Waldseemüller
材料类型: 传记, 互联网资源
文件类型: 书, 互联网资源
所有的著者/提供者: Toby Lester
ISBN: 9781416535317 1416535314
OCLC号码: 300279775
描述: xii, 462 p. : ill, maps ; 23 cm.
内容: Awakening --
Old World. Matthew's maps ; Scourge of God ; The description of the world ; Through the Ocean Sea ; Seeing is believing --
New World. Rediscovery ; Ptolemy the Wise ; The Florentine perspective ; Terrae incognitae ; Into African climes ; The learned men ; Cape of Storms ; Colombo ; The Admiral ; Christ-bearer ; Amerigo --
The whole world. Gymnasium ; World without end ; Afterworld --
The way of the world --
Appendix. The Stevens-Brown map.
责任: Toby Lester.
更多信息:

摘要:

This book, a chronicle of the early sixteenth century creation of the Waldseemuller map offers insight into how monks, classicists, merchants, and other contributors from earlier periods shaped the map's creation. "Old maps lead you to strange and unexpected places, and none does so more ineluctably than the subject of this book: the giant, Waldseemuller world map of 1507." So begins this remarkable story of the map that gave America its name. For millennia Europeans believed that the world consisted of three parts: Europe, Africa, and Asia. They drew the three continents in countless shapes and sizes on their maps, but occasionally they hinted at the existence of a "fourth part of the world," a mysterious, inaccessible place, separated from the rest by a vast expanse of ocean. It was a land of myth until 1507, that is, when Martin Waldseemuller and Matthias Ringmann, two obscure scholars working in the mountains of eastern France, made it real. Columbus had died the year before convinced that he had sailed to Asia, but Waldseemuller and Ringmann, after reading about the Atlantic discoveries of Columbus's contemporary Amerigo Vespucci, came to a startling conclusion: Vespucci had reached the fourth part of the world. To celebrate his achievement, Waldseemuller and Ringmann printed a huge map, for the first time showing the New World surrounded by water and distinct from Asia, and in Vespucci's honor they gave this New World a name: America. This is the story behind that map, a saga of geographical and intellectual exploration, full of outsize thinkers and voyages. Taking a kaleidoscopic approach, the author traces the origins of our modern worldview. His narrative sweeps across continents and centuries, zeroing in on different portions of the map to reveal strands of ancient legend, Biblical prophecy, classical learning, medieval exploration, imperial ambitions, and more. In this telling the map comes alive: Marco Polo and the early Christian missionaries trek across Central Asia and China; Europe's early humanists travel to monastic libraries to recover ancient texts; Portuguese merchants round up the first West African slaves; Christopher Columbus and Amerigo Vespucci make their epic voyages of discovery; and finally, vitally, Nicholas Copernicus makes an appearance, deducing from the new geography shown on the Waldseemuller map that the Earth could not lie at the center of the cosmos. The map literally altered humanity's worldview. One thousand copies of the map were printed, yet only one remains. Discovered accidentally in 1901 in the library of a German castle it was bought in 2003 for the unprecedented sum of $10 million by the Library of Congress, where it is now on permanent public display. Illustrated with rare maps and diagrams, this book tells the story of that map: the story of the geographical and intellectual journeys that have helped us decipher our world.

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