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France in Black Africa

Author: Francis Terry McNamara; National Defense University.
Publisher: Washington, DC : National Defense University, 1989.
Edition/Format:   Book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When, in 1960, France granted independence to its colonies in West and Central Africa-an empire covering an area the size of the contiguous United States-the French still intended to retain influence in Africa. Through a system of accords with these newly independent African nations, based upon ties naturally formed over the colonial years, France has succeeded for three decades in preserving its position in African  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
McNamara, Francis Terry, 1927-
France in Black Africa.
Washington, DC : National Defense University, 1989
(OCoLC)645225272
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Francis Terry McNamara; National Defense University.
OCLC Number: 20265034
Notes: No longer available for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S.G.P.O.
Description: xx, 289 pages : illustrations, maps ; 21 cm
Contents: One: France Acquires and Administers an Empire ---
Two: The Road to Independence---
Three: Cooperation Replaces Colonialism ---
Four: The Sword ---
Five: One Man's Family ---
Six: Was It All Worth It?
Responsibility: Francis Terry McNamara.

Abstract:

When, in 1960, France granted independence to its colonies in West and Central Africa-an empire covering an area the size of the contiguous United States-the French still intended to retain influence in Africa. Through a system of accords with these newly independent African nations, based upon ties naturally formed over the colonial years, France has succeeded for three decades in preserving its position in African affairs. The course of Franco-African relations in the near future, though, is less than certain. In this book, Ambassador Francis Terry McNamara outlines France's acquisition and administration of its Black African empire and traces the former colonies' paths to independence. Drawing upon that background, the ambassador examines the structure of post-independence Franco-African relations and recent strains on those relations, especially African economic crises and the French tendency to focus on Europe. Because of those strains, he suggests, France alone may be unable to support its former dependencies much longer. He believes that long-term solutions to African problems will have to involve international organizations like the World Bank and International Monetary Fund as well as other nations such as the United States and France's European partners. -- From Foreword.

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Linked Data


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