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Freak shows and the modern American imagination : constructing the damaged body from Willa Cather to Truman Capote

Author: Thomas Richard Fahy
Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
Series: American literature readings in the 21st century.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Freak Shows and the Modern American Imagination examines the artistic use of freak shows between 1900 and 1950. During this period, the freak show shifted from a highly popular and profitable form of entertainment to a reviled one. But why? And how does this response reflect larger social changes in the United States at the time? Artists responded to these changes by using the freakish body as a tool for exploring
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Richard Fahy
ISBN: 1403974039 9781403974037
OCLC Number: 62421313
Description: x, 192 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Contents: 'Helpless Meanness": Constructing the Black Body as Freakish Spectacle --
War-Injured Bodies: Fallen Soldiers in American Propaganda and the Works of John Dos Passos, Willa Cather, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner --
Worn, Damaged Bodies in the Great Depression: FSA Photography and the Fiction of John Steinbeck, Tillie Olsen, and Nathanael West --
"Some Unheard-of Thing": Freaks, Families, and Coming of Age in Carson McCullers and Truman Capote.
Series Title: American literature readings in the 21st century.
Responsibility: Thomas Fahy.
More information:

Abstract:

"Freak Shows and the Modern American Imagination examines the artistic use of freak shows between 1900 and 1950. During this period, the freak show shifted from a highly popular and profitable form of entertainment to a reviled one. But why? And how does this response reflect larger social changes in the United States at the time? Artists responded to these changes by using the freakish body as a tool for exploring problematic social attitudes about race, disability, and sexual desire in American culture.

The freak body in art not only reveals disturbing truths about early twentieth century prejudices, but it also becomes a space for exploring the profound social impact of contemporary events such as the Great migration, World War I, and the Great Depression."--BOOK JACKET.

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