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Free to die for their country : the story of the Japanese American draft resisters in World War II

Author: Eric L Muller
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2001.
Series: Chicago series in law and society.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, after stripping them of their livelihoods, liberty, and dignity, the government demanded even more by drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these American citizens grudgingly complied with the draft, but several  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Eric L Muller
ISBN: 0226548228 9780226548227 0226548236 9780226548234
OCLC Number: 46421891
Description: xx, 229 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Contents: 1. Untold patriotism --
2. Uneasy welcome --
3. Injury --
4. Insult to injury --
5. Reaction --
6. Jails within jails --
7. A shock to the conscience --
8. Incarceration redux --
9. Pardon?
Series Title: Chicago series in law and society.
Responsibility: Eric L. Muller ; with a foreword by Daniel K. Inouye.
More information:

Abstract:

Based on years of research and personal interviews, Eric L. Muller recreates the emotions and events that followed the punishment imposed on the young men who refused to follow draft orders in World  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""In the spring of 1942, the federal government forced West Coast Japanese Americans into detainment camps on suspicion of disloyalty. Two years later, after stripping them of their livelihoods, liberty, and dignity, the government demanded even more by drafting them into the same military that had been guarding them as subversives. Most of these American citizens grudgingly complied with the draft, but several hundred refused and practiced a different sort of American patriotism - the patriotism of protest." "Free to Die for Their Country is the first book to tell the story of the men who rejected the government's demands. Based on years of research and personal interviews with the resisters, their families, and their supporters and detractors, Eric L. Muller's work recreates the welter of emotions and events that followed the arrival of the draft notices in 1944: the untenable situation of the Japanese American men caught between national loyalty and personal indignation; the hypocrisy of the government in asking men to die for their country when it had denied them their rights as citizens; the shoddy trials of the protesters that produced convictions and imprisonment; and the treatment of the resisters by the Japanese American community, who looked upon them as pariahs who were hindering progress toward assimilation."--Jacket."
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