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The French revolution

Author: Thomas Carlyle
Publisher: London : Dent ; New York : Dutton, 1973, 1906.
Series: Everyman's library, no. 31-32.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Generations of historians have maintained that in the last decade of the nineteenth century white-supermacist racial ideologies such as Anglo-Saxonism, social Darwinism, benevolent assimilation, and the concept of the "white man's burden" drove American imperialist ventures in the nonwhite world. In Race over Empire, Eric T.L. Love contests this view and argues that racism had nearly the opposite effect. From  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Carlyle, Thomas, 1795-1881.
French revolution.
London : Dent ; New York : Dutton, 1973, 1906
(OCoLC)1019880031
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Carlyle
ISBN: 0460000314 9780460000314
OCLC Number: 2971191
Notes: Includes index, v. 2.
Description: 2 volumes ; 19 cm.
Contents: American imperialism and the racial mountain --
Santo Domingo --
The policy of last resort --
Hawaii annexed --
The Philippines.
Series Title: Everyman's library, no. 31-32.
Responsibility: Thomas Carlyle ; introduction by Hilaire Belloc.
More information:

Abstract:

"Generations of historians have maintained that in the last decade of the nineteenth century white-supermacist racial ideologies such as Anglo-Saxonism, social Darwinism, benevolent assimilation, and the concept of the "white man's burden" drove American imperialist ventures in the nonwhite world. In Race over Empire, Eric T.L. Love contests this view and argues that racism had nearly the opposite effect. From President Grant's attempt to acquire the Dominican Republic in 1870 to the annexations of Hawaii and the Philippines in 1898, Love demonstrates that the imperialists' relationship with the racist ideologies of the era was antagonistic, not harmonious. In a period marked by Jim Crow, lynching, Chinese exclusion, and immigration restriction, Love argues, no pragmatic politician wanted to place nonwhites at the center of an already controversial project by invoking the concept of the "white man's burden." Furthermore, convictions that defined "whiteness" raised great obstacles to imperialist ambitions, particularly when expansionists entered the tropical zone. In lands thought to be too hot for "white blood," white Americans could never be the main beneficiaries of empire." "What emerges from Love's analysis is a critical reinterpretation of the complex interactions between politics, race, labor, immigration, and foreign relations at the dawn of the American century."--Jacket.

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