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Fruitlands : the Alcott family and their search for utopia

Author: Richard Francis
Publisher: New Haven ; London : Yale University Press, ©2010.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This is a definitive account of Fruitlands, one of history's most unsuccessful, but most significant, utopian experiments. It was established in Massachusetts in 1843 by Bronson Alcott (whose ten year old daughter Louisa May, future author of Little Women, was among the members) and an Englishman called Charles Lane, under the watchful gaze of Emerson, Thoreau, and other New England intellectuals. Alcott and Lane  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Named Person: Amos Bronson Alcott; Amos Bronson Alcott
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Francis
ISBN: 9780300140415 030014041X 9780300177909 0300177909
OCLC Number: 601347994
Description: viii, 321 pages, [8] pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Part I. The seed --
ch. 1 . To reproduce perfect men --
ch. 2. Now I know what thought is --
ch. 3. A joy in a winding sheet --
ch. 4. Fabling of worlds --
ch. 5. Rembrandt's pot --
Part II. The fruit --
ch. 6. Hesitations at the plunge --
ch. 7. The mind yields, falters, and fails --
ch. 8. The little wicket gate --
ch. 9. The principle of inverse ratio --
ch. 10. Diffusive illitimable benevolence --
ch. 11. The new waves curl --
ch. 12. Utter subjection of the body --
ch. 13. The consociate family life --
ch. 14. Penniless pilgrimages --
ch. 15. Softly doth the sun descend --
ch. 16. Nectar in a sieve --
ch. 17. Cain and Abel --
ch. 18. Tumbledown Hall.
Responsibility: by Richard Francis.

Abstract:

An account of Fruitlands, one of history's most unsuccessful, but most significant, utopian experiments.  Read more...

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"'Francis brilliantly dissects it all: the diction, the false hopes, the sheer naivety... But he somehow manages to be admirably even-handed, acknowledging that many of Alcott's ideas - regarding the Read more...

 
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schema:description"Part I. The seed -- ch. 1 . To reproduce perfect men -- ch. 2. Now I know what thought is -- ch. 3. A joy in a winding sheet -- ch. 4. Fabling of worlds -- ch. 5. Rembrandt's pot -- Part II. The fruit -- ch. 6. Hesitations at the plunge -- ch. 7. The mind yields, falters, and fails -- ch. 8. The little wicket gate -- ch. 9. The principle of inverse ratio -- ch. 10. Diffusive illitimable benevolence -- ch. 11. The new waves curl -- ch. 12. Utter subjection of the body -- ch. 13. The consociate family life -- ch. 14. Penniless pilgrimages -- ch. 15. Softly doth the sun descend -- ch. 16. Nectar in a sieve -- ch. 17. Cain and Abel -- ch. 18. Tumbledown Hall."@en
schema:description"This is a definitive account of Fruitlands, one of history's most unsuccessful, but most significant, utopian experiments. It was established in Massachusetts in 1843 by Bronson Alcott (whose ten year old daughter Louisa May, future author of Little Women, was among the members) and an Englishman called Charles Lane, under the watchful gaze of Emerson, Thoreau, and other New England intellectuals. Alcott and Lane developed their own version of the doctrine known as Transcendentalism, hoping to transform society and redeem the environment through a strict regime of veganism and celibacy. But physical suffering and emotional conflict, particularly between Lane and Alcott's wife, Abigail, made the community unsustainable. Drawing on the letters and diaries of those involved, the author explores the relationship between the complex philosophical beliefs held by Alcott, Lane, and their fellow idealists and their day to day lives. The result is a vivid and often very funny narrative of their travails, demonstrating the dilemmas and conflicts inherent to any utopian experiment and shedding light on a fascinating period of American history."@en
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