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Fundamentals of polymerization

Author: Broja Mohan Mandal
Publisher: Singapore ; Hackensack, NJ : World Scientific, ©2013.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Over the last twenty years, the field of the chemistry of polymerization witnessed enormous growth through the development of new concepts, catalysts, processes etc. Examples are: non classical living polymerizations (group transfer polymerization, living carbocationic polymerization, living radical polymerization and living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP)); new catalysts (metallocenes and late  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Broja Mohan Mandal
ISBN: 9789814322850 9814322857
OCLC Number: 824081578
Description: 1 online resource (xxii, 445 p.) : ill.
Contents: Ch. 1. Introduction. 1.1. Nomenclature. 1.2. Structural and repeating (or repeat) units. 1.3. Classification. 1.4. Functionality. 1.5. Designed branched polymers. 1.6. Physical state. 1.7. Structure-property relationship. 1.8. Thermodynamics of polymerization. 1.9. Polymerizability of internal olefins. 1.10. Molecular weights and molecular weight distributions --
ch. 2. Step polymerization. 2.1. Principle of equal reactivity of functional groups and kinetics of polymerization. 2.2. Ring vs. chain formation. 2.3. Intermolecular interchange reactions. 2.4. Degree of polymerization. 2.5. Molecular weight distribution. 2.6. Prediction of gel point in polyfunctional polycondensation. 2.7. Thermosetting resins. 2.8. Engineering plastics. 2.9. High performance polymers. 2.10. Nonconventional step polymerization --
ch. 3. Radical polymerization. 3.1. General features. 3.2. Kinetics of homogeneous radical polymerization. 3.3. Reaction orders in initiator and monomer. 3.4. Initiators. 3.5. Determination of polymer end groups. 3.6. Initiator efficiency. 3.7. Thermal polymerization and its kinetics. 3.8. Kinetic chain length, degree of polymerization, and chain transfer. 3.9. Inhibition and retardation of polymerization. 3.10. Rate constants of propagation and termination. 3.11. The course of polymerization and gel effect. 3.12. Popcorn polymerization. 3.13. Dead end polymerization. 3.14. Molecular weight distribution. 3.15. Living radical polymerization (LRP) --
ch. 4. Anionic polymerization. 4.1. Living anionic polymerization --
ch. 5. Coordination polymerization. 5.1. Ziegler-Natta catalysts. 5.2. Metallocene catalysts. 5.3. Late transition metal catalysts. 5.4. Living polymerization of alkenes --
ch. 6. Cationic polymerization. 6.1. The nucleophilicity and electrophilicity scales. 6.2. Bronsted acids as initiators. 6.3. Lewis acids as coinitiators. 6.4. End functionalized polymers. 6.5. Photoinitiated cationic polymerization. 6.6. Propagation rate constants --
ch. 7. Ring-opening polymerization and ring-opening metathesis polymerization. 7.1. General features. 7.2. Cyclic ethers. 7.3. Cyclic acetals. 7.4. Cyclic esters. 7.5. Lactams. 7.6. N-carboxy-[symbol]-aminoacid anhydrides. 7.7. Oxazolines (cyclic imino ethers). 7.8. Cyclic amines. 7.9. Cyclic sulfides. 7.10. Cyclosiloxanes. 7.11. Cyclotriphosphazenes. 7.12. Cyclic olefins --
ch. 8. Chain copolymerization. 8.1. Terminal model of copolymerization. 8.2. Penultimate model of copolymerization. 8.3. Living radical copolymerization --
ch. 9. Heterophase polymerization. 9.1. Particle stabilization mechanisms. 9.2. Suspension polymerization. 9.3. Emulsion polymerization. 9.4. Inverse emulsion polymerization. 9.5. Miniemulsion polymerization. 9.6. Microemulsion polymerization. 9.7. Dispersion polymerization. 9.8. Heterophase living radical polymerization.
Responsibility: Broja Mohan Mandal.

Abstract:

Over the years, the field of the chemistry of polymerization witnessed enormous growth through the development of fresh concepts, catalysts, and processes. This book deals with fundamentals of  Read more...

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