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Galatea

Author: John Lyly; G K Hunter; David M Bevington
Publisher: Manchester UK ; New York : Manchester University Press : Distributed in the USA by St. Martin's Press, ©2000.
Series: Revels plays.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Galatea and Midas are two of John Lyly's most engaging plays. Galatea (or Gallathea) and Phillida are dressed up in male clothes by their fathers so that they can avoid the requirement of the god Neptune that every year 'the fairest and chastest virgin in all the country' be sacrificed to a sea-monster. Hiding together in the forest, the two maidens fall in love, each supposing the other to be a young man. This  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Drama
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Lyly, John, 1554?-1606.
Galatea.
Manchester UK ; New York : Manchester University Press : Distributed in the USA by St. Martin's Press, c2000
(OCoLC)606348297
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: John Lyly; G K Hunter; David M Bevington
ISBN: 0719030951 9780719030956
OCLC Number: 42733668
Description: xv, 282 p. ; 22 cm.
Contents: Galatea: Introduction --
Galatea --
Midas: Introduction --
Midas.
Series Title: Revels plays.
Other Titles: Midas.
Galatea and Midas
Responsibility: John Lyly ; edited by George K. Hunter. Midas / John Lyly ; edited by David Bevington.
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Abstract:

"Galatea and Midas are two of John Lyly's most engaging plays. Galatea (or Gallathea) and Phillida are dressed up in male clothes by their fathers so that they can avoid the requirement of the god Neptune that every year 'the fairest and chastest virgin in all the country' be sacrificed to a sea-monster. Hiding together in the forest, the two maidens fall in love, each supposing the other to be a young man. This leads to delightful complications that remind us of the mix-ups in Shakespeare's romantic comedies. Galatea has become the subject of considerable feminist critical study in recent years." "Midas (1590) uses mythology in quite a different way, dramatising two stories about King Midas (the golden touch and the ass's ears) in such a way as to fashion a satire of King Philip of Spain (and of any tyrant like him) for colossal greediness and folly. In the wake of the defeat of Philip's Armada fleet and its attempted invasion of England in 1588, this satire was calculated to win the approval of Queen Elizabeth and her court."--Jacket.

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Linked Data


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schema:reviewBody""Galatea and Midas are two of John Lyly's most engaging plays. Galatea (or Gallathea) and Phillida are dressed up in male clothes by their fathers so that they can avoid the requirement of the god Neptune that every year 'the fairest and chastest virgin in all the country' be sacrificed to a sea-monster. Hiding together in the forest, the two maidens fall in love, each supposing the other to be a young man. This leads to delightful complications that remind us of the mix-ups in Shakespeare's romantic comedies. Galatea has become the subject of considerable feminist critical study in recent years." "Midas (1590) uses mythology in quite a different way, dramatising two stories about King Midas (the golden touch and the ass's ears) in such a way as to fashion a satire of King Philip of Spain (and of any tyrant like him) for colossal greediness and folly. In the wake of the defeat of Philip's Armada fleet and its attempted invasion of England in 1588, this satire was calculated to win the approval of Queen Elizabeth and her court."--Jacket."
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