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Galileo in Rome : the rise and fall of a troublesome genius

Author: William R Shea; Mariano Artigas
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The book offers a fascinating account of the six trips Galileo made to Rome, from his first visit at age 23, as an unemployed mathematician, to his final fateful journey to face the Inquisition. The authors reveal why the theory that the Earth revolves around the Sun, set forth in Galileo's Dialogue, stirred a hornet's nest of theological issues, and they argue that, despite these issues, the Church might have  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Biographies
Named Person: Galileo Galilei; Galileo Galilei; Galileo Galilei
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: William R Shea; Mariano Artigas
ISBN: 0195165985 9780195165982
OCLC Number: 51753143
Description: xi, 226 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Job hunting and the path to Rome : first trip, 1587 --
The door of fame springs open : second trip, 29 March-4 June 1611 --
Roman clouds : third trip, 10 December 1615-4 June 1616 --
Roman sunshine : fourth trip, 23 April-16 June 1624 --
Star-crossed heavens : fifth trip, 3 May-26 June 1630 --
Foul weather in Rome : sixth trip, 13 February-6 July 1633.
Responsibility: William R. Shea and Mariano Artigas.
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Abstract:

"The book offers a fascinating account of the six trips Galileo made to Rome, from his first visit at age 23, as an unemployed mathematician, to his final fateful journey to face the Inquisition. The authors reveal why the theory that the Earth revolves around the Sun, set forth in Galileo's Dialogue, stirred a hornet's nest of theological issues, and they argue that, despite these issues, the Church might have accepted Copernicus if there had been solid proof. More interesting, they show how Galileo dug his own grave. To get the imprimatur, he brought political pressure to bear on the Roman Censor. He disobeyed a Church order not to teach the heliocentric theory. And he had a character named Simplicio (which in Italian sounds like simpleton) raise the same objections to heliocentrism that the Pope had raised with Galileo. The authors show that throughout the trial, until the final sentence and abjuration, the Church treated Galileo with great deference, and once he was declared guilty commuted his sentence to house arrest."--Jacket.

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schema:reviewBody""The book offers a fascinating account of the six trips Galileo made to Rome, from his first visit at age 23, as an unemployed mathematician, to his final fateful journey to face the Inquisition. The authors reveal why the theory that the Earth revolves around the Sun, set forth in Galileo's Dialogue, stirred a hornet's nest of theological issues, and they argue that, despite these issues, the Church might have accepted Copernicus if there had been solid proof. More interesting, they show how Galileo dug his own grave. To get the imprimatur, he brought political pressure to bear on the Roman Censor. He disobeyed a Church order not to teach the heliocentric theory. And he had a character named Simplicio (which in Italian sounds like simpleton) raise the same objections to heliocentrism that the Pope had raised with Galileo. The authors show that throughout the trial, until the final sentence and abjuration, the Church treated Galileo with great deference, and once he was declared guilty commuted his sentence to house arrest."--BOOK JACKET."
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