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Games people play : the psychology of human relationships.

Author: Eric Berne
Publisher: New York : Grove Press, [1964]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Eric Berne developed the technique of transactional analysis in group therapy, and here presents his findings to the general public in a witty and entertaining best-seller. He shows how people can achieve a new self-awareness by analyzing their behavior in terms of "games." People tend to live their lives by consistently playing out certain games in their interpersonal relationships. They play these games for a  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Berne, Eric.
Games people play.
New York : Grove Press, [1964]
(OCoLC)571122497
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Eric Berne
OCLC Number: 555165
Description: 192 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Contents: pt. 1: Analysis of games. Structural analysis ; Transactional analysis ; Procedures and rituals ; Pastimes ; Games --
pt. 2: A thesaurus of games. Life games ; Marital games ; Party games ; Sexual games ; Underworld games ; Consulting room games ; Good games --
pt. 3: Beyond games. The significance of games ; The players ; A paradigm ; Autonomy ; The attainment of autonomy ; After games, what?

Abstract:

Eric Berne developed the technique of transactional analysis in group therapy, and here presents his findings to the general public in a witty and entertaining best-seller. He shows how people can achieve a new self-awareness by analyzing their behavior in terms of "games." People tend to live their lives by consistently playing out certain games in their interpersonal relationships. They play these games for a variety of reasons: to avoid confronting reality, to conceal ulterior motives, to rationalize their activities, or to avoid actual participation. These games--if they are not destructive--are both desirable and necessary, and here Dr. Berne offers an analysis of 36 common games, which he breaks down into seven major categories.--Adapted from publisher description.

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