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The garden in the machine : a field guide to independent films about place

Author: Scott MacDonald
Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, ©2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Counter The Garden in the Machine explores the evocations of place, and particularly American place, that have become so central to the representational and narrative strategies of alternative and mainstream film and video. Scott MacDonald contextualizes his discussion with a wide-ranging and deeply informed analysis of the depiction of place in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, painting, and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Scott MacDonald
ISBN: 0520227379 9780520227378 0520227387 9780520227385
OCLC Number: 46935868
Description: xxvi, 461 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Contents: 1. The Garden in the Machine. Larry Gottheim's Fog Line. Thomas Cole's The Oxbow. J.J. Murphy's Sky Blue Water Light Sign. panoramas --
2. Voyages of Life. Thormas Cole's The Voyage of Life. Larry Gottheim's Horizons --
3. Avant-Gardens. Kenneth Anger's Eaux d'artifice. Marie Menken's Glimpse of the Garden. Carolee Schneemann's Fuses. Stan Brakhage's The Garden of Earthly Delights. Marjorie Keller's The Answering Furrow. Anne Charlotte Robertson's Melon Patches, Or Reasons to Go on Living. Rose Lowder's ecological cinema --
4. Re-envlsloning the American West. Babette Mangolte's The Sky on Location. James Benning's North on Evers. Oliver Stone's Natural Born Killers. Ellen Spiro's Roam Sweet Home --
5. From the Subllme to the Vernacular.
Responsibility: Scott MacDonald.
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Abstract:

Counter The Garden in the Machine explores the evocations of place, and particularly American place, that have become so central to the representational and narrative strategies of alternative and mainstream film and video. Scott MacDonald contextualizes his discussion with a wide-ranging and deeply informed analysis of the depiction of place in nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature, painting, and photography. Accessible and engaging, this book examines the manner in which these films represent nature and landscape in particular, and location in general. It offers us both new readings of the films under consideration and an expanded sense of modern film history. Among the many antecedents to the films and videos discussed here are Thomas Cole's landscape painting, Thoreau's Walden, Olmsted and Vaux's Central Park, and Eadweard Muybridge's panoramic photographs of San Francisco. MacDonald analyzes the work of many accomplished avant-garde filmmakers: Kenneth Anger, Bruce Baillie, James Benning, Stan Brakhage, Nathaniel Dorsky, Hollis Frampton, Ernie Gehr, Larry Gottheim, Robert Huot, Peter Hutton, Marjorie Keller, Rose Lowder, Marie Menken, J.J. Murphy, Andrew Noren, Pat O'Neill, Leighton Pierce, Carolee Schneemann, and Chick Strand. He also examines a variety of recent commercial feature films, as well as independent experiments in documentary and such contributions to independent video history as George Kuchar's Weather Diaries and Ellen Spiro's Roam Sweet Home. MacDonald reveals the spiritual underpinnings of these works and shows how issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and class are conveyed as filmmakers attempt to discover forms of Edenic serenity within the Machine of modern society. Both personal and scholarly, The Garden in the Machine will be an invaluable resource for those interested in investigating and experiencing a broader spectrum of cinema in their teaching, in their research, and in their lives.

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Linked Data


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