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The garden of Ediacara : discovering the first complex life

Author: Mark A McMenamin
Publisher: New York : Columbia University Press, ©1998.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
During an expedition in Sonora, Mexico, paleontologist Mark A.S. McMenamin unearthed fossils of creatures dated at approximately 600 million years old -- making them the oldest large body fossils ever discovered. These circular fossils, known as Ediacarans, seemed to defy explanation. Representatives of marine life forms that existed in Precambrian times, as much as fifty million years before life on earth began to  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Mark A McMenamin
ISBN: 0231105584 9780231105583 0231105592 9780231105590
OCLC Number: 37588521
Description: xii, 295 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: ch. 1. Mystery fossil --
ch. 2. The sand menagerie --
ch. 3. Vermiforma --
ch. 4. The Nama group --
ch. 5. Back to the garden --
ch. 6. Cloudina --
ch. 7. Ophrydium --
ch. 8. Reunite Rodinia!--
ch. 9. The Mexican find: Sonora 1995 --
ch. 10. The lost world --
ch. 11. A family tree --
ch. 12. Awareness of Ediacara --
ch. 13. Revenge of the mole rats --
Epilogue: Parallel evolution.
Responsibility: Mark A.S. McMenamin.

Abstract:

Including twenty-two photographs and more than fifty drawings of these strikingly beautiful early life forms, this book presents a mesmerizing documentary of a major scientific discovery: the oldest  Read more...

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"[A] thought-provoking personal exploration of what the Ediacaran fossils represent." -- "Tree"

 
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