skip to content
The garden squares of Boston Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The garden squares of Boston

Author: Phebe S Goodman
Publisher: Hanover : University Press of New England, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Of the many types of historic landscapes that have become treasured open spaces in North America's dense urban fabric, the garden (or residential) square largely has been overlooked. Yet the garden square played an important role in the planning of Philadelphia, Savannah, Boston, and New York, several of America's major early cities. Boston's garden squares most closely resemble the squares of London in purpose and
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Phebe S Goodman
ISBN: 1584652985 9781584652984
OCLC Number: 52631231
Description: xviii, 179 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm
Contents: Introduction: From London to North America --
Downtown squares --
South End squares --
Evolution and preservation --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Phebe S. Goodman.
More information:

Abstract:

Of the many types of historic landscapes that have become treasured open spaces in North America's dense urban fabric, the garden (or residential) square has been largely overlooked. This work tells  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"Goodman contributes to our understanding of the development of Boston in the nineteenth century. Her thorough discussion of the South End squares clearly demonstrates that the gardens were planned Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/52631231>
library:oclcnum"52631231"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookEdition"1st ed."
schema:copyrightYear"2003"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2003"
schema:description"Introduction: From London to North America -- Downtown squares -- South End squares -- Evolution and preservation -- Conclusion."@en
schema:description""Although garden squares pre-date well-documented municipal parks, the historical significance of these squares is not fully understood. In this book, Goodman tells the story of Boston's garden squares and offers a glimpse into early urban planning. Goodman traces Charles Bulfinch's connection to these historic landscapes and compares them to their London prototypes. While Bostonians and others are familiar with Boston's iconic Louisburg Square on Beacon Hill, few people know that Boston's South End neighborhood boasts a group of eight garden squares."--Jacket."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/794436>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The garden squares of Boston"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/52631231>
schema:reviewBody""Of the many types of historic landscapes that have become treasured open spaces in North America's dense urban fabric, the garden (or residential) square largely has been overlooked. Yet the garden square played an important role in the planning of Philadelphia, Savannah, Boston, and New York, several of America's major early cities. Boston's garden squares most closely resemble the squares of London in purpose and appearance. Intended as speculative real estate ventures, the London garden squares were distinguished by row houses and ornamental iron fences enclosing gardens planted with trees and grass. The gardens served as welcome patches of greenery for affluent residents who chose to live in relatively cramped quarters within the city. As such, gardens were the raison d'etre for this early form of urban residential design.""
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GBA3U3862>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.