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Gender and the poetics of reception in Poe's circle

Author: Eliza Richards
Publisher: Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Series: Cambridge studies in American literature and culture, 144.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Poe is frequently portrayed as an isolated, idiosyncratic genius who was unwilling or unable to adapt himself to the cultural conditions of his time. Eliza Richards revises this portrayal through an exploration of his collaborations and rivalries with his female contemporaries. Richards demonstrates that he staged his performance of tortured isolation in the salons and ephemeral publications of New York City in
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Named Person: Edgar Allan Poe; Elizabeth Oakes Prince Smith; Frances Sargent Locke Osgood; Sarah Helen Whitman; Edgar Allan Poe; Edgar Allan Poe; Edgar Allan Poe; Frances Sargent Locke Osgood; Edgar Allan Poe; Elizabeth Oakes Prince Smith; Sarah Helen Whitman
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Eliza Richards
ISBN: 0521832810 9780521832816
OCLC Number: 53993017
Notes: Based on author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Michigan, 1997.
Description: xvii, 238 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: "The poetess" and Poe's performance of the feminine --
Frances Sargent Osgood, salon poetry, and the erotic voice of print --
Sarah Helen Whitman, spiritualist poetics, and the "phantom voice" of Poe --
Elizabeth Oakes Smith's "unspeakable eloquence" --
Coda : the raven's return.
Series Title: Cambridge studies in American literature and culture, 144.
Responsibility: Eliza Richards.
More information:

Abstract:

"Poe is frequently portrayed as an isolated, idiosyncratic genius who was unwilling or unable to adapt himself to the cultural conditions of his time. Eliza Richards revises this portrayal through an exploration of his collaborations and rivalries with his female contemporaries. Richards demonstrates that he staged his performance of tortured isolation in the salons and ephemeral publications of New York City in conjunction with prominent women poets whose work he both emulated and sought to surpass. She introduces and interprets the work of three important and largely forgotten women poets: Frances Sargent Osgood, Sarah Helen Whitman, and Elizabeth Oakes Smith.

Richards re-evaluates the work of these writers, and nineteenth-century lyric practices more generally, by examining poems in the context of their circulation and reception within nineteenth-century print culture. This book will be of interest to scholars of American print culture as well as specialists in nineteenth-century literature and poetry."--BOOK JACKET.

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