skip to content
The genius of Gilbert Stuart Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The genius of Gilbert Stuart

Author: Dorinda Evans; Gilbert Stuart
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©1999.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Gilbert Stuart was probably the most gifted American portraitist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He is best known for his "Athenaeum" portrait of George Washington, which is today a national icon. In this book, Dorinda Evans combines a wealth of original insights with revealing new documentation to present a long-needed, scholarly treatment of Stuart's life and influential work." "In  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
Biographies
Named Person: Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert Stuart; Gilbert (Künstler) Stuart
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Dorinda Evans; Gilbert Stuart
ISBN: 0691059454 9780691059457
OCLC Number: 39659747
Description: xix, 177 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
Contents: 1. The Formation of an Artist --
2. The English School --
3. A Reputation for Likeness --
4. The Portrait of Washington --
5. The Years in Philadelphia --
6. Painting the Intrinsic.
Other Titles: Gilbert Stuart
Responsibility: Dorinda Evans.
More information:

Abstract:

"Gilbert Stuart was probably the most gifted American portraitist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He is best known for his "Athenaeum" portrait of George Washington, which is today a national icon. In this book, Dorinda Evans combines a wealth of original insights with revealing new documentation to present a long-needed, scholarly treatment of Stuart's life and influential work." "In assessing Stuart's artistic importance, Evans argues that his 1796 "Athenaeum" portrait of Washington - the most recognized likeness of the president - was a landmark in the expression of contemporary ideas about moral strength. More generally, she shows that Stuart's painting reflected a genius for interpreting the sitter's personality and a growing awareness of painting's public role in conveying uplifting messages about social dignity and virtue. She challenges the view that his later paintings show a decline, revealing many as concerned with expressing the human soul in a fresh and naturalistic way." "Evans also explores Stuart's private life, discounting recent portrayals of him as an outcast and a confidence trickster. She concludes that his notoriously erratic behavior, which veered from prolonged lethargy to reckless activity and extravagance, was a sign of manic-depressive illness. Evans gathers information about Stuart from a wide variety of previously untapped sources, including unpublished interviews with the artist that shed new light on controversies over his portraits of Washington and Thomas Jefferson."--Jacket.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/39659747>
library:oclcnum"39659747"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/61689381>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"(1755"
schema:birthDate"1755"
schema:deathDate"1828"
schema:deathDate"1828)"
schema:familyName"Stuart"
schema:givenName"Gilbert (Künstler)"
schema:givenName"Gilbert"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert."
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert (Künstler)"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828."
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, (1755-1828)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:alternateName"Gilbert Stuart"@en
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/61689381>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"(1755"
schema:birthDate"1755"
schema:deathDate"1828"
schema:deathDate"1828)"
schema:familyName"Stuart"
schema:givenName"Gilbert (Künstler)"
schema:givenName"Gilbert"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert."
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert (Künstler)"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828"
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, 1755-1828."
schema:name"Stuart, Gilbert, (1755-1828)"
schema:copyrightYear"1999"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1999"
schema:description"1. The Formation of an Artist -- 2. The English School -- 3. A Reputation for Likeness -- 4. The Portrait of Washington -- 5. The Years in Philadelphia -- 6. Painting the Intrinsic."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/20918650>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The genius of Gilbert Stuart"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/39659747>
schema:reviewBody""Gilbert Stuart was probably the most gifted American portraitist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. He is best known for his "Athenaeum" portrait of George Washington, which is today a national icon. In this book, Dorinda Evans combines a wealth of original insights with revealing new documentation to present a long-needed, scholarly treatment of Stuart's life and influential work." "In assessing Stuart's artistic importance, Evans argues that his 1796 "Athenaeum" portrait of Washington - the most recognized likeness of the president - was a landmark in the expression of contemporary ideas about moral strength. More generally, she shows that Stuart's painting reflected a genius for interpreting the sitter's personality and a growing awareness of painting's public role in conveying uplifting messages about social dignity and virtue. She challenges the view that his later paintings show a decline, revealing many as concerned with expressing the human soul in a fresh and naturalistic way." "Evans also explores Stuart's private life, discounting recent portrayals of him as an outcast and a confidence trickster. She concludes that his notoriously erratic behavior, which veered from prolonged lethargy to reckless activity and extravagance, was a sign of manic-depressive illness. Evans gathers information about Stuart from a wide variety of previously untapped sources, including unpublished interviews with the artist that shed new light on controversies over his portraits of Washington and Thomas Jefferson."--Jacket."
schema:workExample
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.