omitir hasta el contenido
The geography of nowhere : the rise and decline of America's man-made landscape Ver este material de antemano
CerrarVer este material de antemano
Chequeando…

The geography of nowhere : the rise and decline of America's man-made landscape

Autor: James Howard Kunstler
Editorial: New York : Simon & Schuster, ©1993.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"Eighty percent of everything ever built in America has been built since the end of World War II. This tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside is not simply an expression of our economic predicament, but in large part a cause. It is the everyday environment where most Americans live and work, and it represents a gathering calamity whose  Leer más
Calificación:

(todavía no calificado) 0 con reseñas - Ser el primero.

Temas
Más materiales como éste

 

Encontrar un ejemplar en la biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Encontrando bibliotecas que tienen este material…

Detalles

Formato físico adicional: Online version:
Kunstler, James Howard.
Geography of nowhere.
New York : Simon & Schuster, c1993
(OCoLC)622673318
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: James Howard Kunstler
ISBN: 0671707744 9780671707743
Número OCLC: 27726774
Descripción: 303 p. ; 25 cm.
Contenido: 1: Scary places --
2: American space --
3: Life on the gridiron --
4: Eden updated --
5: Yesterday's tomorrow --
6: Joyride --
7: Evil empire --
8: How to mess up a town --
9: Place called home --
10: Loss of community --
11: Three cities --
12: Capitals of unreality --
13: Better places --
Notes --
Bibliography --
Index.
Responsabilidad: James Howard Kunstler.
Más información:

Resumen:

"Eighty percent of everything ever built in America has been built since the end of World War II. This tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside is not simply an expression of our economic predicament, but in large part a cause. It is the everyday environment where most Americans live and work, and it represents a gathering calamity whose effects we have hardly begun to measure." "In The Geography of Nowhere, James Howard Kunstler traces America's evolution from a nation of Main Streets and coherent communities to a land where everyplace is like noplace in particular, where the city is a dead zone and the countryside a wasteland of cars and blacktop. Now that the great suburban build-out is over, Kunstler argues, we are stuck with the consequences: a national living arrangement that destroys civic life while imposing enormous social costs and economic burdens. Kunstler explains how our present zoning laws impoverish the life of our communities, and how all our efforts to make automobiles happy have resulted in making human beings miserable. He shows how common building regulations have led to a crisis in affordable housing, and why street crime is directly related to our traditional disregard for the public realm." "Kunstler takes the reader on a historical journey to understand how Americans came to view their landscape as a commodity for exploitation rather than a social resource. He explains why our towns and cities came to be wounded by the abstract dogmas of Modernism, and reveals the paradox of a people who yearn for places worthy of their affection, yet bend their efforts in an economic enterprise of destruction that degrades and defaces what they most deeply desire.".

Reseñas

Reseñas contribuidas por usuarios
Recuperando reseñas de GoodReads…
Recuperando reseñas de DOGObooks…

Etiquetas

Ser el primero.
Confirmar este pedido

Ya ha pedido este material. Escoja OK si desea procesar el pedido de todos modos.

Datos enlazados


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/27726774>
library:oclcnum"27726774"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/27726774>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/813425>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Architecture and society."@en
schema:name"Architecture--Environmental aspects"@en
schema:copyrightYear"1993"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1993"
schema:description"1: Scary places -- 2: American space -- 3: Life on the gridiron -- 4: Eden updated -- 5: Yesterday's tomorrow -- 6: Joyride -- 7: Evil empire -- 8: How to mess up a town -- 9: Place called home -- 10: Loss of community -- 11: Three cities -- 12: Capitals of unreality -- 13: Better places -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Index."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/795693574>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The geography of nowhere : the rise and decline of America's man-made landscape"@en
schema:numberOfPages"303"
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/27726774>
schema:reviewBody""Eighty percent of everything ever built in America has been built since the end of World War II. This tragic landscape of highway strips, parking lots, housing tracts, mega-malls, junked cities, and ravaged countryside is not simply an expression of our economic predicament, but in large part a cause. It is the everyday environment where most Americans live and work, and it represents a gathering calamity whose effects we have hardly begun to measure." "In The Geography of Nowhere, James Howard Kunstler traces America's evolution from a nation of Main Streets and coherent communities to a land where everyplace is like noplace in particular, where the city is a dead zone and the countryside a wasteland of cars and blacktop. Now that the great suburban build-out is over, Kunstler argues, we are stuck with the consequences: a national living arrangement that destroys civic life while imposing enormous social costs and economic burdens. Kunstler explains how our present zoning laws impoverish the life of our communities, and how all our efforts to make automobiles happy have resulted in making human beings miserable. He shows how common building regulations have led to a crisis in affordable housing, and why street crime is directly related to our traditional disregard for the public realm." "Kunstler takes the reader on a historical journey to understand how Americans came to view their landscape as a commodity for exploitation rather than a social resource. He explains why our towns and cities came to be wounded by the abstract dogmas of Modernism, and reveals the paradox of a people who yearn for places worthy of their affection, yet bend their efforts in an economic enterprise of destruction that degrades and defaces what they most deeply desire."."
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Cerrar ventana

Inicie una sesión con WorldCat 

¿No tienes una cuenta? Puede fácilmente crear una cuenta gratuita.