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The ghosts of evolution : nonsensical fruit, missing partners, and other ecological anachronisms

Author: Connie C Barlow
Publisher: New York : Basic Books, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Ecological science is changing because of a recent discovery: Every field, forest, and park is full of living organisms adapted for relationships with creatures that have long been extinct. In this book, the author shows how this idea of "missing partners" in nature evolved from isolated, curious examples into an idea that is transforming how ecologists understand the entire flora and fauna of the Americas. Barlow's  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Connie C Barlow
ISBN: 0465005519 9780465005512
OCLC Number: 46718210
Description: xi, 291 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Ghost stories --
Ecological anachronisms and their missing partners --
Megafaunal dispersal syndrome --
Advancing the theory --
Fruitful longing --
Extreme anachronisms --
Armaments from another era --
Who are the ghosts? --
Consequences --
Great work.
Responsibility: Connie Barlow.
More information:

Abstract:

Ecological science is changing because of a recent discovery: Every field, forest, and park is full of living organisms adapted for relationships with creatures that have long been extinct. In this book, the author shows how this idea of "missing partners" in nature evolved from isolated, curious examples into an idea that is transforming how ecologists understand the entire flora and fauna of the Americas. Barlow's report on a scientific program in its infancy puts the cutting edge of evolutionary thought within the grasp of any amateur naturalist. This book connects modern parks, supermarket produce sections, and even shopping-mall parking lots with remnants of the elephants, camels, giant sloths, rhinos, and lions that once roamed North America.

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