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Globalization and the international financial system : what's wrong and what can be done

Author: Peter Isard
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge, 2005.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Economic globalization has given rise to frequent and severe financial crises in emerging market economies. Other countries are also unsuccessful in their efforts to generate economic growth and reduce poverty. This book provides perspectives on various aspects of the international financial system that contribute to financial crises and growth failures, and discusses the remedies that economists have proposed for  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Peter Isard
ISBN: 0521843898 9780521843898 0521605075 9780521605076
OCLC Number: 54966563
Description: xiii, 370 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: pt. 1. Background --
1. Introduction --
1.1. Globalization --
1.2. Overview of the book --
2. The evolution of the international monetary system --
2.1. The rise and fall of international monetary regimes, 1870-1945 --
2.1.1. The international gold standard --
2.1.2. Wartime convertibility restrictions --
2.1.3. Free floating --
2.1.4. A gold-exchange standard --
2.1.5. An uncoordinated hybrid system --
2.1.6. Managed floating --
2.1.7. Arrangements during World War II --
2.2. The Bretton Woods system : 1946-1971 --
2.2.1. Creation of the IMF and World Bank --
2.2.2. Adjustment and collapse : the power of internationally mobile capital --
2.3. The prevailing international monetary system --
2.3.1. Amendment of the agreement governing exchange rate arrangements --
2.3.2. European monetary integration --
2.3.3. Salient characteristics of the exchange rate system --
2.3.4. Agenda setting and international policy coordination --
2.4. Liberalized finance and the sea change in international capital flows --
2.5. Concluding perspectives --
3. The International Monetary Fund --
3.1. Purposes and activities --
3.2. Organizational and decision-making structures --
3.3. Surveillance --
3.3.1. Country surveillance : core activities and policy advice --
3.3.2. Country surveillance : new directions since the mid-1990s --
3.3.3. Global and regional surveillance --
3.4. Lending and economic stabilization programs --
3.4.1. Lending policies and facilities --
3.4.2. Program design and conditionality --
3.5. Technical assistance and research --
3.6. Criticisms of the IMF --
3.7. Concluding perspectives. pt. 2. International financial crises and obstacles to growth --
4. Factors contributing to international financial crises--
4.1. Historical and conceptual perspectives --
4.2. Selected crises of the 1990s : contributing factors and initial stages --
4.2.1. Mexico, 1994-1995 --
4.2.2. Thailand, 1997 --
4.2.3. Indonesia, 1997-1998 --
4.2.4. Korea, 1997-1998 --
4.2.5. Malaysia, 1997-1998 --
4.2.6. Russia, 1998 --
4.2.7. Brazil, 1998-1999 --
4.2.8. Sources of vulnerability and common characteristics --
4.3. IMF influence during precrisis periods --
4.4. Concluding perspectives --
5. The effects of crises and controversies over how to respond --
5.1. The sudden stop phenomenon --
5.2. Contagion --
5.3. Controversies over the macroeconomic and structural policy responses --
5.3.1. Exchange rate arrangements --
5.3.2. Interest rates policies --
5.3.3. Fiscal adjustment --
5.3.4. Structural policies and the scope of conditionality --
5.4. The issue of moral hazard : controversies over crisis lending --
5.5. What worked best? : impressions from Korea's recovery --
5.6. Concluding perspectives --
6. Perspectives on economic growth and poverty reduction --
6.1. Proximate determinants of growth : physical capital, human capital, and technology --
6.2 Deeper determinants of growth --
6.2.1. Institutions and incentives --
6.2.2. Openness to international trade --
6.2.3. Openness to international capital flows --
6.3. Poverty --
6.4. Aid and debt relief --
6.5. Concluding perspectives. pt. 3. The agenda for reform --
7. What can individual countries do? --
7.1. Devise a sensible strategy for liberalizing domestic financial markets and international capital flows --
7.2. Strengthen institutions, information, and the financial and corporate sectors --
7.3. Adopt sustainable exchange rate arrangements --
7.4. Maintain debt discipline, sound macroeconomic policies, and market confidence --
7.5. Open the economy to trade and FDI in a manner that results in growth-enhancing activities --
7.6. Concluding perspectives --
8. How can the international financial system be reformed? --
8.1. Strengthen the quality and impact of IMF surveillance --
8.2. Induce changes in the composition of international capital flows --
8.3. Introduce contingent debt contracts or other mechanisms for hedging against macroeconomic risks --
8.4. Address informational imperfections and distorted incentives on the supply side of international capital flows --
8.5. Revamp debt resolution procedures --
8.6. Strengthen the frameworks for development aid and official nonconcessional lending --
8.7. Concluding perspectives.
Responsibility: Peter Isard.
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This book discusses the problematic side of the international financial system.  Read more...

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'Peter Isard brings deep scholarship and experience to the bewildering array of problems surrounding the brave new world of globalized international finance. No single volume I know does a better job Read more...

 
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schema:description"pt. 2. International financial crises and obstacles to growth -- 4. Factors contributing to international financial crises-- 4.1. Historical and conceptual perspectives -- 4.2. Selected crises of the 1990s : contributing factors and initial stages -- 4.2.1. Mexico, 1994-1995 -- 4.2.2. Thailand, 1997 -- 4.2.3. Indonesia, 1997-1998 -- 4.2.4. Korea, 1997-1998 -- 4.2.5. Malaysia, 1997-1998 -- 4.2.6. Russia, 1998 -- 4.2.7. Brazil, 1998-1999 -- 4.2.8. Sources of vulnerability and common characteristics -- 4.3. IMF influence during precrisis periods -- 4.4. Concluding perspectives -- 5. The effects of crises and controversies over how to respond -- 5.1. The sudden stop phenomenon -- 5.2. Contagion -- 5.3. Controversies over the macroeconomic and structural policy responses -- 5.3.1. Exchange rate arrangements -- 5.3.2. Interest rates policies -- 5.3.3. Fiscal adjustment -- 5.3.4. Structural policies and the scope of conditionality -- 5.4. The issue of moral hazard : controversies over crisis lending -- 5.5. What worked best? : impressions from Korea's recovery -- 5.6. Concluding perspectives -- 6. Perspectives on economic growth and poverty reduction -- 6.1. Proximate determinants of growth : physical capital, human capital, and technology -- 6.2 Deeper determinants of growth -- 6.2.1. Institutions and incentives -- 6.2.2. Openness to international trade -- 6.2.3. Openness to international capital flows -- 6.3. Poverty -- 6.4. Aid and debt relief -- 6.5. Concluding perspectives."@en
schema:description"pt. 1. Background -- 1. Introduction -- 1.1. Globalization -- 1.2. Overview of the book -- 2. The evolution of the international monetary system -- 2.1. The rise and fall of international monetary regimes, 1870-1945 -- 2.1.1. The international gold standard -- 2.1.2. Wartime convertibility restrictions -- 2.1.3. Free floating -- 2.1.4. A gold-exchange standard -- 2.1.5. An uncoordinated hybrid system -- 2.1.6. Managed floating -- 2.1.7. Arrangements during World War II -- 2.2. The Bretton Woods system : 1946-1971 -- 2.2.1. Creation of the IMF and World Bank -- 2.2.2. Adjustment and collapse : the power of internationally mobile capital -- 2.3. The prevailing international monetary system -- 2.3.1. Amendment of the agreement governing exchange rate arrangements -- 2.3.2. European monetary integration -- 2.3.3. Salient characteristics of the exchange rate system -- 2.3.4. Agenda setting and international policy coordination -- 2.4. Liberalized finance and the sea change in international capital flows -- 2.5. Concluding perspectives -- 3. The International Monetary Fund -- 3.1. Purposes and activities -- 3.2. Organizational and decision-making structures -- 3.3. Surveillance -- 3.3.1. Country surveillance : core activities and policy advice -- 3.3.2. Country surveillance : new directions since the mid-1990s -- 3.3.3. Global and regional surveillance -- 3.4. Lending and economic stabilization programs -- 3.4.1. Lending policies and facilities -- 3.4.2. Program design and conditionality -- 3.5. Technical assistance and research -- 3.6. Criticisms of the IMF -- 3.7. Concluding perspectives."@en
schema:description"pt. 3. The agenda for reform -- 7. What can individual countries do? -- 7.1. Devise a sensible strategy for liberalizing domestic financial markets and international capital flows -- 7.2. Strengthen institutions, information, and the financial and corporate sectors -- 7.3. Adopt sustainable exchange rate arrangements -- 7.4. Maintain debt discipline, sound macroeconomic policies, and market confidence -- 7.5. Open the economy to trade and FDI in a manner that results in growth-enhancing activities -- 7.6. Concluding perspectives -- 8. How can the international financial system be reformed? -- 8.1. Strengthen the quality and impact of IMF surveillance -- 8.2. Induce changes in the composition of international capital flows -- 8.3. Introduce contingent debt contracts or other mechanisms for hedging against macroeconomic risks -- 8.4. Address informational imperfections and distorted incentives on the supply side of international capital flows -- 8.5. Revamp debt resolution procedures -- 8.6. Strengthen the frameworks for development aid and official nonconcessional lending -- 8.7. Concluding perspectives."@en
schema:description"Economic globalization has given rise to frequent and severe financial crises in emerging market economies. Other countries are also unsuccessful in their efforts to generate economic growth and reduce poverty. This book provides perspectives on various aspects of the international financial system that contribute to financial crises and growth failures, and discusses the remedies that economists have proposed for addressing the underlying problems. It also sheds light on a central feature of the international financial system that remains mysterious to many economists and most non-economists: the activities of the International Monetary Fund and the factors that influence its effectiveness. Dr Isard offers policy perspectives on what countries can do to reduce their vulnerabilities to financial crises and growth failures, and a number of general directions for systemic reform. The breadth of the agenda provides grounds for optimism that the international financial system can be strengthened considerably without revolutionary change."@en
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