skip to content
Going to war with Japan, 1937-1941 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Going to war with Japan, 1937-1941

Author: Jonathan G Utley
Publisher: Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, ©1985.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
For almost five years, Franklin Roosevelt's administration tried to keep America from being drawn into war with Japan. To understand why executive efforts failed, Utley analyzes the ideas and motives not only of the men at the top but also of the bureaucrats. He concludes that the United States ultimately acted on pragmatic views rooted in deeply held economic beliefs. Although Roosevelt and Secretary of State  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Cordell Hull
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan G Utley
ISBN: 0870494457 9780870494451
OCLC Number: 10876821
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xiv, 238 p. : ill., ports., maps ; 23 cm.
Responsibility: Jonathan G. Utley.

Abstract:

For almost five years, Franklin Roosevelt's administration tried to keep America from being drawn into war with Japan. To understand why executive efforts failed, Utley analyzes the ideas and motives not only of the men at the top but also of the bureaucrats. He concludes that the United States ultimately acted on pragmatic views rooted in deeply held economic beliefs. Although Roosevelt and Secretary of State Cordell Hull were important decision makers, Utley finds that a powerful bureaucracy increasingly influenced U.S. foreign policy. This group was less concerned with defending China or with preserving treaties than with promoting a particular dogma. Japan sought to secure markets and raw materials by seizing control of Asia. Rejecting the advice of moderates, American bureaucrats rigidly insisted upon a "liberal-commercial" world order that would permit free trade and free investment for all nations, particularly the United States. Despite the intentions of the president and the secretary of state, Washington hawks were eventually able to maneuver economic warfare that led to military hostilities.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/10876821>
library:oclcnum"10876821"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/10876821>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"United States--Japan."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Place
schema:name"Japan--United States."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Event
schema:name"Geschichte 1937-1941."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:name"Hull, Cordell, 1871-1955"
schema:about
schema:author
schema:copyrightYear"1985"
schema:datePublished"1985"
schema:description"For almost five years, Franklin Roosevelt's administration tried to keep America from being drawn into war with Japan. To understand why executive efforts failed, Utley analyzes the ideas and motives not only of the men at the top but also of the bureaucrats. He concludes that the United States ultimately acted on pragmatic views rooted in deeply held economic beliefs. Although Roosevelt and Secretary of State Cordell Hull were important decision makers, Utley finds that a powerful bureaucracy increasingly influenced U.S. foreign policy. This group was less concerned with defending China or with preserving treaties than with promoting a particular dogma. Japan sought to secure markets and raw materials by seizing control of Asia. Rejecting the advice of moderates, American bureaucrats rigidly insisted upon a "liberal-commercial" world order that would permit free trade and free investment for all nations, particularly the United States. Despite the intentions of the president and the secretary of state, Washington hawks were eventually able to maneuver economic warfare that led to military hostilities."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/133136>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Going to war with Japan, 1937-1941"
schema:numberOfPages"238"
schema:publisher
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"University of Tennessee Press"
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.