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The golden age of television : notes from the survivors

Author: Max Wilk
Publisher: New York : Delacorte Press, ©1976.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
From the blurb: Do you remember when your TV screen was only ten inches wide, when it broadcast only five hours a day, when neighbors came in every Saturday night to watch Sid Caesar and kids were in every afternoon to see Howdy Doody? Max Wilk, one of television's first writers (who is now one of its foremost), has given us a wonderful memoir of the days when the mighty screen was, indeed golden-its creations  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Wilk, Max.
Golden age of television.
New York : Delacorte Press, ©1976
(OCoLC)647626008
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Max Wilk
ISBN: 0440029503 9780440029502
OCLC Number: 2188987
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xiv, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Acknowledgments --
Preface --
Test pattern-The Ford Television Theatre --
Worthington Miner and Studio One --
Remembering mama --
Summertime follies --
Mr Peepers --
Hal Kanter, Ed Wynn and others --
Good evening from Washington, this is --
Three weird sisters of CBS --
NBC spectaculars --
Now, live from New York-Philco Playhouse --
Hiya-Ralphie-Boy! Art Carney and Jackie Gleason --
Seems like old times: Julius La Rosa and Arthur Godfrey --
Hail Sid! Hail Imogene! --
Mr Burns, Miss Allen, and Mr Benny --
Will you sign in, Mr? --
Peace: Dave Garroway --
Various nightmares and horror stories --
Captain and the Kids --
Eye openers and closers --
Kukla, Fran and Ollie --
Pat Weaver --
Next to closing: Lucille Ball --
Finale --
Index.
Responsibility: Max Wilk.

Abstract:

From the blurb: Do you remember when your TV screen was only ten inches wide, when it broadcast only five hours a day, when neighbors came in every Saturday night to watch Sid Caesar and kids were in every afternoon to see Howdy Doody? Max Wilk, one of television's first writers (who is now one of its foremost), has given us a wonderful memoir of the days when the mighty screen was, indeed golden-its creations rough, spontaneous, and unforgettable. These were the days when writers and actors thought nothing of creating an hour-long TV drama once a week and producing it live-The Ford Television Theatre and the Philco Playhouse made James Dean, Grace Kelly, and Paul Newman household names. The mad antics of Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca delighted us all, but even writers like Mel Brooks and Woody Allen were hard put to be so funny for so little money and with such tight deadlines. Max Wilt reminisces with Art Carney about his years with "the Great One," Jackie Gleason, and brings us back to those late nights with Steve Allen and Jack Paar when talk shows were still in their infancy. He shows us the love and care (and hysteria) that went into those early TV efforts and lets us in on the heartache and hilarity which were inevitable by-products of attempting to do so much with such primitive resources. Was Jack Benny really as funny off-camera as on? What happened when Jimmy Cagney forgot his lines? Did Julius La Rosa and Arthur Godfrey ever make up? Why was I Love Lucy one of the biggest breakthroughs in TV technology? Max Wilk probes deep into the recesses of the television monolith and makes the fantastic decade of the media's birth and growth truly come alive.

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