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Gorgias, Menexenus, Protagoras

Author: Plato.; Malcolm Schofield; Tom Griffith
Publisher: Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Series: Cambridge texts in the history of political thought.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Early works
Early works to 1800
Named Person: Protagoras.; Protagoras.
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Plato.; Malcolm Schofield; Tom Griffith
ISBN: 9780521837293 0521837294 9780521546003 0521546001
OCLC Number: 422764998
Description: xliv, 214 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Gorgias --
Menexenus --
Protagoras.
Series Title: Cambridge texts in the history of political thought.
Other Titles: Gorgias.
Menexenus.
Protagoras.
Works.
Responsibility: Plato ; edited by Malcolm Schofield ; translated by Tom Griffith.
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Abstract:

Three Platonic dialogues newly translated by Tom Griffith and introduced and annotated by Malcolm Schofield.  Read more...

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'This text is perfect for political theory or intellectual history courses at any post-secondary level; nor would it be irrelevant for a philosophy class with supplementary discussion or reading. The Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Presented in the popular Cambridge Texts format are three early Platonic dialogues in a new English translation by Tom Griffith that combines elegance, accuracy, freshness and fluency. Together they offer strikingly varied examples of Plato's critical encounter with the culture and politics of fifth and fourth century Athens. Nowhere does he engage more sharply and vigorously with the presuppositions of democracy. The Gorgias is a long and impassioned confrontation between Socrates and a succession of increasingly heated interlocutors about political rhetoric as an instrument of political power. The short Menexenus contains a pastiche of celebratory public oratory, illustrating its self-delusions. In the Protagoras, another important contribution to moral and political philosophy in its own right, Socrates takes on leading intellectuals (the 'sophists') of the later fifth century BC and their pretensions to knowledge. The dialogues are introduced and annotated by Malcolm Schofield, a leading authority on ancient Greek political philosophy."--Jacket."
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