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Governing wayward consumers : self-change and recovery in debtors anonymous

Author: Adam Morenberg
Publisher: [Tampa, Fla.] : University of South Florida, 2004.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--University of South Florida, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : State or province government publication : eBook   Computer File : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
ABSTRACT: Previous research on self-change in support groups has focused on the ways individuals accomplish self-change in the "local cultures" of the support group settings. This ethnographic study of the 12-step self-help group Debtors Anonymous (DA) departs from that tradition by focusing on the ways that DA members achieve self-change by employing "recovery" strategies learned from the group in their everyday
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Details

Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Adam Morenberg
OCLC Number: 56564118
Notes: Title from PDF of title page.
Document formatted into pages; contains 50 pages.
Details: System requirements: World Wide Web browser and PDF reader.; Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Responsibility: by Adam Morenberg.

Abstract:

ABSTRACT: Previous research on self-change in support groups has focused on the ways individuals accomplish self-change in the "local cultures" of the support group settings. This ethnographic study of the 12-step self-help group Debtors Anonymous (DA) departs from that tradition by focusing on the ways that DA members achieve self-change by employing "recovery" strategies learned from the group in their everyday lives. DA members enter the group during financial crises, and often believe they cannot manage their own personal finances. By learning techniques of financial management taught by the group, DA members gradually gain "sobriety" and financial management skills. This analysis highlights the important role played by various technologies of self-construction in DA members' recovery efforts.

ABSTRACT: Drawing on narrative and governmentality theories, this analysis shows how DA members accomplish self-change by learning to become self-monitoring and self-restrained financial managers and consumers.

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Linked Data


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