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Grass-roots socialism : radical movements in the Southwest, 1895-1943

Author: James R Green
Publisher: Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, ©1978.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Grass-Roots Socialism, James Green includes information about the party's propaganda techniques, especially those used in the lively newspapers that claimed fifty thousand subscribers in the Southwest by 1913, and information about the attractive summer camp meetings that drew thousands of poor white tenant farmers to week-long agitation and education sessions. In this broadly based study, Green examines such  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James R Green
ISBN: 0807103675 9780807103678 0807107735 9780807107737
OCLC Number: 3609497
Description: xxiv, 450 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction. The setting: a new south in the west --
I. From Populism to Socialism in the Southwest, 1895-1907 --
II. Southwestern Progressivism and Agrarian Socialism, 1908-1911 --
III. Troublesome questions --
IV. Propagating the Socialist gospel --
V. Industrial unions and the Socialist Party, 1910-1912: the Proletarian perspective --
VI. "The swelling minority": patterns of Socialist support in the Southwest, 1912 --
VII. Socialism and the Southwestern class struggle, 1913-1915 --
VIII. From Socialist activity to social banditry: the politics of frustration, 1915-1916 --
IX. War and repression, 1917-1920 --
X. "If you don't weaken": Southwestern Socialists in the desperate years, 1921-1943.
Responsibility: James R. Green.

Abstract:

In Grass-Roots Socialism, James Green includes information about the party's propaganda techniques, especially those used in the lively newspapers that claimed fifty thousand subscribers in the Southwest by 1913, and information about the attractive summer camp meetings that drew thousands of poor white tenant farmers to week-long agitation and education sessions. In this broadly based study, Green examines such popular leaders as Oklahoma's Oscar Ameringer (the "Mark Twain of American Socialism"), "Red Tom" Hickey of Texas, and Kate Richards O'Hare, who was second only to Eugene Debs as a Socialist orator. - Back cover.

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