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The great chief justice : John Marshall and the rule of law

Auteur : Charles F Hobson
Éditeur : Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, ©1996.
Collection : American political thought.
Édition/format :   Livre : Biographie : Publication gouvernementale provinciale ou d'état : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
John Marshall remains one of the towering figures in the landscape of American law. From the Revolution to the age of Jackson, he played a critical role in defining the "province of the judiciary" and the constitutional limits of legislative action. In this masterly study, Charles Hobson clarifies the coherence and thrust of Marshall's jurisprudence while keeping in sight the man as well as the jurist. Hobson argues
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Détails

Format – détails additionnels : Online version:
Hobson, Charles F.
Great chief justice.
Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c1996
(OCoLC)605059246
Personne nommée : John Marshall; John (Politiker) Marshall; John Marshall
Type d’ouvrage : Biographie, Publication gouvernementale, Publication gouvernementale provinciale ou d'état
Format : Livre
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Charles F Hobson
ISBN : 0700607889 9780700607884 0700610316 9780700610310
Numéro OCLC : 34244193
Description : xv, 256 p. ; 24 cm
Contenu : Republican revolutionary --
The common law background --
The province of the Judiciary: Marbury v. Madison --
Property rights and the contract clause --
National supremacy and states' rights --
The limits of Judicial power --
Principle, precedent, and interpretation.
Titre de collection : American political thought.
Responsabilité : Charles F. Hobson.

Résumé :

From the Revolution to the Age of Jackson, John Marshall played a crucial role in defining the "province of the judiciary" and the constitutional limits of legislative action. This book clarifies the  Lire la suite...

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Données liées


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schema:description"intent upon appropriating the lawmaking powers of Congress. Rather, he was deeply committed to a principled jurisprudence that was based on a steadfast devotion to a "science of law" richly steeped in the common law tradition. As Hobson shows, such jurisprudence governed every aspect of Marshall's legal philosophy and court opinions, including his understanding of judicial review. The chief justice, Hobson contends, did not invent judicial review (as many have claimed)."@en
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schema:description"but consolidated its practice by adapting common law methods to the needs of a new nation. In practice, his use of judicial review was restrained, employed almost exclusively against acts of the state legislatures. Ultimately, he wielded judicial review to prevent the states from undermining the power of a national government still struggling to establish sovereignty at home and respect abroad."@en
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