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The great divergence : China, Europe, and the making of the modern world economy

Author: Kenneth Pomeranz
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©2000.
Series: Princeton economic history of the Western world.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This text offers insight into one of the classic questions of history: why did sustained industrial growth begin in Northwest Europe, despite surprising similarities between advanced areas of Europe and East Asia? As the author shows, as recently as 1750, parallels between these two parts of the world were very high in life expectancy, consumption, product and factor markets, and the strategies of households.  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Kenneth Pomeranz
ISBN: 0691005435 9780691005430 0691090106 9780691090108
OCLC Number: 41835186
Awards: Winner of American Association's John K. Fairbank Prize 2000.
Winner of World History Association Book Prize 2001.
Runner-up for Choice Magazine Outstanding Reference/Academic Book Award 2000.
Description: x, 382 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Comparisons, connections, and narratives of European economic development --
A World of Surprising Resemblances. Europe before Asia? Population, capital accumulation, and technology in explanations of European development --
Market economies in Europe and Asia --
From New Ethos to New Economy? Consumption, Investment, and Capitalism. Luxury consumption and the rise of capitalism --
Visible hands: firm structure, sociopolitical structure, and "capitalism" in Europe and Asia --
Beyond Smith and Malthus: From Ecological Constraints to Sustained Industrial Growth. Shared constraints: ecological strain in Western Europe and East Asia --
Abolishing the land constraint: the Americas as a new kind of periphery.
Series Title: Princeton economic history of the Western world.
Responsibility: Kenneth Pomeranz.
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Abstract:

Offers an insight into one of the classic questions of history: why did sustained industrial growth begin in Northwest Europe? This book shows, as recently as 1750, parallels between these two parts  Read more...

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Winner of the 2000 John K. Fairbank Prize, American Historical Association Co-Winner of the 2001 Book Prize, World History Association One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 2000 "The vast Read more...

 
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Excellent case study on the development of globalisation and trade

by cabusm@philau.edu (WorldCat user published 2006-06-02) Excellent Permalink
I read this book in my fourth year of studies at the National University of Ireland. It is not an easy read, but if one is looking for a good compliation of economic data and commentary on the historic process of globalisation, look no further.
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