aller au contenu
The great wave : gilded age misfits, Japanese eccentrics, and the opening of old Japan Aperçu de cet ouvrage
FermerAperçu de cet ouvrage
Vérifiant…

The great wave : gilded age misfits, Japanese eccentrics, and the opening of old Japan

Auteur : Christopher E G Benfey
Éditeur : New York : Random House, ©2003.
Édition/format :   Livre : AnglaisVoir toutes les éditions et les formats
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
When the United States entered the Gilded Age after the Civil War the nation lost its philosophical moorings and looked eastward to "Old Japan," with its seemingly untouched indigenous culture, for balance and perspective. Japan, meanwhile, was trying to reinvent itself as a more cosmopolitan, modern state, ultimately transforming itself, in the course of twenty-five years, from a feudal backwater to an  Lire la suite...
Évaluation :

(pas encore évalué) 0 avec des critiques - Soyez le premier.

Sujets
Plus comme ceci

 

Trouver un exemplaire dans la bibliothèque

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Recherche de bibliothèques qui possèdent cet ouvrage...

Détails

Format – détails additionnels : Online version:
Benfey, Christopher E. G., 1954-
Great wave.
New York : Random House, c2003
(OCoLC)680433013
Type d’ouvrage : Ressource Internet
Format : Livre, Ressource Internet
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Christopher E G Benfey
ISBN : 0375503277 9780375503276
Numéro OCLC : 50511058
Description : xviii, 332 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contenu : The floating world (Herman Melville and John Manjiro) --
A collector of seashells (Edward Sylvester Morse) --
The Boston tea party (Kakuzo Okakura and Isabella Gardner) --
A season of nirvana ;Falling water (Henry Adams and John La Farge) --
Messages from Mars (Percival Lowell and Mabel Loomis Todd) --
The mountain of skulls (Lafcadio Hearn and Mary Fenollosa) --
The Judo Room (Theodore Roosevelt and William Sturgis Bigelow) --
Epilogue: circa 1913: the escape from time.
Responsabilité : Christopher Benfey.
Plus d’informations :

Résumé :

When the United States entered the Gilded Age after the Civil War the nation lost its philosophical moorings and looked eastward to "Old Japan," with its seemingly untouched indigenous culture, for balance and perspective. Japan, meanwhile, was trying to reinvent itself as a more cosmopolitan, modern state, ultimately transforming itself, in the course of twenty-five years, from a feudal backwater to an international power. This great wave of historical and cultural reciprocity between the two young nations, which intensified during the late 1800s, brought with it some larger-than-life personalities, as the lure of unknown foreign cultures prompted pilgrimages back and forth across the Pacific. In The great wave, Benfey tells the story of the tightly knit group of nineteenth-century travelers--connoisseurs, collectors, and scientists--who dedicated themselves to exploring and preserving Old Japan. These travelers include Herman Melville, Henry Adams, John La Farge, Lafcadio Hearn, Mabel Loomis Todd, Edward Sylvester Morse, Percival Lowell, and President Theodore Roosevelt. As well, we learn of famous Easterners come West, including Kakuzo Okakura and Shuzo Kuki.

Critiques

Critiques d’utilisateurs
Récupération des critiques de GoodReads...
Récuperation des critiques DOGObooks…

Tags

Soyez le premier.
Confirmez cette demande

Vous avez peut-être déjà demandé cet ouvrage. Veuillez sélectionner OK si vous voulez poursuivre avec cette demande quand même.

Données liées


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/50511058>
library:oclcnum"50511058"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/50511058>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1352373>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Civilization--Japanese influences."@en
schema:name"Civilization--Japanese influences"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2003"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2003"
schema:description"When the United States entered the Gilded Age after the Civil War the nation lost its philosophical moorings and looked eastward to "Old Japan," with its seemingly untouched indigenous culture, for balance and perspective. Japan, meanwhile, was trying to reinvent itself as a more cosmopolitan, modern state, ultimately transforming itself, in the course of twenty-five years, from a feudal backwater to an international power. This great wave of historical and cultural reciprocity between the two young nations, which intensified during the late 1800s, brought with it some larger-than-life personalities, as the lure of unknown foreign cultures prompted pilgrimages back and forth across the Pacific. In The great wave, Benfey tells the story of the tightly knit group of nineteenth-century travelers--connoisseurs, collectors, and scientists--who dedicated themselves to exploring and preserving Old Japan. These travelers include Herman Melville, Henry Adams, John La Farge, Lafcadio Hearn, Mabel Loomis Todd, Edward Sylvester Morse, Percival Lowell, and President Theodore Roosevelt. As well, we learn of famous Easterners come West, including Kakuzo Okakura and Shuzo Kuki."@en
schema:description"The floating world (Herman Melville and John Manjiro) -- A collector of seashells (Edward Sylvester Morse) -- The Boston tea party (Kakuzo Okakura and Isabella Gardner) -- A season of nirvana ;Falling water (Henry Adams and John La Farge) -- Messages from Mars (Percival Lowell and Mabel Loomis Todd) -- The mountain of skulls (Lafcadio Hearn and Mary Fenollosa) -- The Judo Room (Theodore Roosevelt and William Sturgis Bigelow) -- Epilogue: circa 1913: the escape from time."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/932854680>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The great wave : gilded age misfits, Japanese eccentrics, and the opening of old Japan"@en
schema:numberOfPages"332"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Fermer la fenêtre

Veuillez vous identifier dans WorldCat 

Vous n’avez pas de compte? Vous pouvez facilement créer un compte gratuit.