skip to content
The greatest killer : smallpox in history, with a new introduction Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The greatest killer : smallpox in history, with a new introduction

Author: Donald R Hopkins
Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
(Publisher-supplied data) Once known as the "great fire" or "spotted death," smallpox has been rivaled only by plague as a source of supreme terror. Although naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated in 1977, recent terrorist attacks in the United States have raised the possibility that someone might craft a deadly biological weapon from stocks of the virus that remain in known or perhaps unknown laboratories. In  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Donald R Hopkins
ISBN: 0226351661 9780226351667 0226351688 9780226351681
OCLC Number: 49305765
Notes: Originally published as Princes and peasants, 1983.
Description: xviii, 380 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Variola rex --
2. The most terrible of all the ministers of death --
3. Heavenly flowers --
4. Kiss of the Goddess --
5. The spotted death --
6. The Great Fire --
7. A destroying angel --
8. Erythrotherapy and eradication.
Other Titles: Princes and peasants
Responsibility: Donald R. Hopkins.
More information:

Abstract:

(Publisher-supplied data) Once known as the "great fire" or "spotted death," smallpox has been rivaled only by plague as a source of supreme terror. Although naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated in 1977, recent terrorist attacks in the United States have raised the possibility that someone might craft a deadly biological weapon from stocks of the virus that remain in known or perhaps unknown laboratories. In The Greatest Killer, Donald R. Hopkins provides a fascinating account of smallpox and its role in human history. Starting with its origins 10,000 years ago in Africa or Asia, Hopkins follows the disease through the ancient and modern worlds, showing how smallpox removed or temporarily incapacitated heads of state, halted or exacerbated wars, and devastated populations that had never been exposed to the disease. In Hopkins's history, smallpox was one of the most dangerous-and influential-factors that shaped the course of world events.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(4)

User lists with this item (2)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/49305765>
library:oclcnum"49305765"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/49305765>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2002"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2002"
schema:description"(Publisher-supplied data) Once known as the "great fire" or "spotted death," smallpox has been rivaled only by plague as a source of supreme terror. Although naturally occurring smallpox was eradicated in 1977, recent terrorist attacks in the United States have raised the possibility that someone might craft a deadly biological weapon from stocks of the virus that remain in known or perhaps unknown laboratories. In The Greatest Killer, Donald R. Hopkins provides a fascinating account of smallpox and its role in human history. Starting with its origins 10,000 years ago in Africa or Asia, Hopkins follows the disease through the ancient and modern worlds, showing how smallpox removed or temporarily incapacitated heads of state, halted or exacerbated wars, and devastated populations that had never been exposed to the disease. In Hopkins's history, smallpox was one of the most dangerous-and influential-factors that shaped the course of world events."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/364489651>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The greatest killer : smallpox in history, with a new introduction"@en
schema:numberOfPages"380"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.