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Guns, germs, and steel : [the fates of human societies]

Author: Jared M Diamond; Grover Gardner
Publisher: St. Paul, Minn. : HighBridge Co., [2001], ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English : AbridgedView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Is the balance of power in the world, the essentially unequal distribution of wealth and clout that has shaped civilization for centuries, a matter of survival of the fittest, or merely of the luckiest? In Guns, Germs, and Steel, UCLA professor (and author of the best-seller bearing the same title) Jared Diamond makes a compelling case for the latter. Diamond's theory is that the predominance of white Europeans (and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Sound recording
Audiobooks
History
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Jared M Diamond; Grover Gardner
ISBN: 1565115147 9781565115149
OCLC Number: 48412863
Notes: Compact discs.
Subtitle from container.
Performer(s): Read by Grover Gardner.
Description: 5 sound discs (6 hr.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Contents: Disc 1. 1. Yali's question: the regionally differing courses of history --
7. Up to the starting line: what happened on all the continents before 11,000 B.C? Disc 2. 2. Farmer power: the roots of guns, germs and steel --
5. History's haves and have-nots: geographic differences in the onset of food production --
6. To farm or not to farm: causes of the spread of food production --
9. How to make an almond: the unconscious development of ancient crops. Disc 3. 1. Apples or Indians: why did peoples of some regions fail to domesticate plants? --
4. Zebras, unhappy marriages, and the Anna Karenina principle: why were most big wild mammal species never domesticated? --
8. Spacious skies and tilted axes: why did food production spread at different rates on different continents? Disc 4. 3. Lethal gift of livestock: the evolution of germs --
9. Necessity's mother: the evolution of technology. Disc 5. 3. From egalitarianism to kleptocracy: the evolution of government and religion --
8. Epilogue.
Other Titles: Guns, germs, & steel
Fates of human societies
Responsibility: Jared Diamond.

Abstract:

Is the balance of power in the world, the essentially unequal distribution of wealth and clout that has shaped civilization for centuries, a matter of survival of the fittest, or merely of the luckiest? In Guns, Germs, and Steel, UCLA professor (and author of the best-seller bearing the same title) Jared Diamond makes a compelling case for the latter. Diamond's theory is that the predominance of white Europeans (and Americans of European descent) over other cultures has nothing to do with racial superiority, as many have claimed, but is instead the result of nothing more, or less, than geographical coincidence. His argument, in a nutshell, is that the people who populated the Middle East's "fertile crescent" thousands of years ago were the first farmers, blessed with abundant natural resources (native crops such as wheat and barley, domesticable animals like pigs, goats, sheep, and cows). When their descendents migrated to Europe and northern Africa, climates similar to the crescent's, those same assets, which were unavailable in most of the rest of the world, led to the flourishing of advanced civilizations in those places as well. Add to that their ability to control fire, and Europeans eventually developed the guns and steel (swords, trains, etc.) they used to conquer the planet (the devastating diseases they brought with them, like smallpox, were an unplanned "benefit" to their subjugation of, for instance, Peru's native Incas). The program uses location footage (from New Guinea, South America, Africa, and elsewhere), interviews, reenactments, maps, and Diamond's own participation to support his thesis.

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Linked Data


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