skip to content
Hacker culture Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Hacker culture

Author: Douglas Thomas
Publisher: Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Demonized by governments and the media as criminals, glorified within their own subculture as outlaws, hackers have played a major role in the short history of computers and digital culture-and have continually defied our assumptions about technology and secrecy through both legal and illicit means. In Hacker Culture, Douglas Thomas provides an in-depth history of this important and fascinating subculture,  Read more...
Rating:

based on 1 rating(s) 1 with a review

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Douglas Thomas
ISBN: 0816633452 9780816633456
OCLC Number: 47922733
Description: xxvii, 266 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The evolution of the hacker --
Hacking culture --
Hacking as the performance of technology: reading the "Hacker manifesto" --
Hacking in the 1990s --
Hacking representation --
Representing hacker culture: reading Phrack --
(Not) Hackers: subculture, style, and media incorporation --
Hacking law --
Technology and punishment: the juridical construction of the hacker --
Epilogue: Kevin Mitnick and Chris Lamprecht.
Responsibility: Douglas Thomas.
More information:

Abstract:

Demonized by governments and the media as criminals, glorified within their own subculture as outlaws, hackers have played a major role in the short history of computers and digital culture-and have continually defied our assumptions about technology and secrecy through both legal and illicit means. In Hacker Culture, Douglas Thomas provides an in-depth history of this important and fascinating subculture, contrasting mainstream images of hackers with a detailed firsthand account of the computer underground. Addressing such issues as the commodification of the hacker ethos by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, the high-profile arrests of prominent hackers, and conflicting self-images among hackers themselves, Thomas finds that popular hacker stereotypes reflect the public's anxieties about the information age far more than they do the reality of hacking.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

WorldCat User Reviews (1)

study in all subject

by Rikin_patel (WorldCat user published 2007-05-27) Very Good Permalink
i will study knoledge in online this study
  • Was this review helpful to you?
  •   
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/47922733>
library:oclcnum"47922733"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/47922733>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/872400>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Computer programming--Moral and ethical aspects"@en
schema:name"Computer programming--Moral and ethical aspects."@en
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"2002"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2002"
schema:description"Demonized by governments and the media as criminals, glorified within their own subculture as outlaws, hackers have played a major role in the short history of computers and digital culture-and have continually defied our assumptions about technology and secrecy through both legal and illicit means. In Hacker Culture, Douglas Thomas provides an in-depth history of this important and fascinating subculture, contrasting mainstream images of hackers with a detailed firsthand account of the computer underground. Addressing such issues as the commodification of the hacker ethos by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, the high-profile arrests of prominent hackers, and conflicting self-images among hackers themselves, Thomas finds that popular hacker stereotypes reflect the public's anxieties about the information age far more than they do the reality of hacking."@en
schema:description"The evolution of the hacker -- Hacking culture -- Hacking as the performance of technology: reading the "Hacker manifesto" -- Hacking in the 1990s -- Hacking representation -- Representing hacker culture: reading Phrack -- (Not) Hackers: subculture, style, and media incorporation -- Hacking law -- Technology and punishment: the juridical construction of the hacker -- Epilogue: Kevin Mitnick and Chris Lamprecht."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/58749680>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Hacker culture"@en
schema:numberOfPages"266"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.