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The harp and the eagle : Irish-American volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865

Author: Susannah J Ural; Richard J Sommers; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
Publisher: Carlisle Barracks, PA : U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center, 2010.
Series: Perspectives in military history
Edition/Format:   Video : Videodisc : National government publication   Visual material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
On the eve of the Civil War, the Irish were one of America's largest ethnic groups, and approximately 150,000 fought for the Union. Analyzing letters and diaries written by soldiers and civilians; military, church, and diplomatic records; and community newspapers, Susannah Ural Bruce significantly expands the story of Irish-American Catholics in the Civil War, and reveals a complex picture of those who fought for  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Susannah J Ural; Richard J Sommers; U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
OCLC Number: 601823745
Notes: Title from disc label.
Lecture held March 17, 2010 in Ridgway Hall, U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center.
Presentation based on: The harp and the eagle : Irish-American volunteers and the Union Army, 1861-1865, by Susannah Ural Bruce.
Performer(s): Presenter, Susannah J. Ural ; introduced by Richard J. Sommers.
Description: 1 videodisc (64 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Series Title: Perspectives in military history
Responsibility: Susannah Ural.

Abstract:

On the eve of the Civil War, the Irish were one of America's largest ethnic groups, and approximately 150,000 fought for the Union. Analyzing letters and diaries written by soldiers and civilians; military, church, and diplomatic records; and community newspapers, Susannah Ural Bruce significantly expands the story of Irish-American Catholics in the Civil War, and reveals a complex picture of those who fought for the Union. While the population was diverse, many Irish Americans had dual loyalties to the U.S. and Ireland, which influenced their decisions to volunteer, fight, or end their military service. When the Union cause supported their interests in Ireland and America, large numbers of Irish Americans enlisted. However, as the war progressed, the Emancipation Proclamation, federal draft, and sharp rise in casualties caused Irish Americans to question and sometimes abandon the war effort because they viewed such changes as detrimental to their families and futures in America and Ireland. By recognizing these competing and often fluid loyalties, The Harp and the Eagle sheds new light on the relationship between Irish-American volunteers and the Union Army, and how the Irish made sense of both the Civil War and their loyalty to the United States.

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