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Heat exchanger engineering techniques : process, air conditioning, and electronic systems : a treatise on heat exchanger installations that did not meet performance

Author: Michael J Nee
Publisher: New York : ASME Press, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Nee, Michael J., 1924-
Heat exchanger engineering techniques.
New York : ASME Press, ©2003
(OCoLC)606042142
Online version:
Nee, Michael J., 1924-
Heat exchanger engineering techniques.
New York : ASME Press, ©2003
(OCoLC)608104869
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael J Nee
ISBN: 0791801675 9780791801673
OCLC Number: 51460661
Description: xxvi, 324 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Preface --
Acknowledgment --
List of Figures --
List of Tables --
Part 1. Process Exchangers --
Chapter 1. Personnel and Requirements --
1.1. The Selection of Exchangers --
1.2. Personnel Involved in Identifying Requirements --
1.3. Requirements by Application --
1.4. Problems Due to a Missing Requirement --
1.5. Requirements That Define What Is and What Is Not Wanted --
1.6. Requirements for Fluid Properties --
1.7. Summary of Problem Areas --
1.8. Cleaning and Fouling --
1.9. Contract Requirements between Seller and Buyer --
Chapter 2. Considerations before Finalizing the Selection --
2.1. Considerations Before Finalizing the Selection --
2.2. Effect of Tube Length and Mechanical Cleaning upon Cost --
2.3. Parallel Flow --
2.4. Tube-Side Considerations in Selecting an Exchanger --
Chapter 3. Considerations in Selecting Shell-and-Tube Exchangers --
3.1. General --
3.2. Tube Sizes and Patterns --
3.3. Shell-Side Designation and Nomenclature --
3.4. Shell Types --
3.5. Front-End Types --
3.6. Summary of Shell-and-Tube Designs and Their Limitations --
Chapter 4. Air Coolers --
4.1. Beginning the Process of Selecting an Air Cooler --
4.2. Some Governing Conditions --
4.3. Structural Considerations --
4.4. Forced- versus Induced-Draft Air Coolers --
4.5. Process Heat Transfer Coil or Section --
4.6. Plate-Fin and Spiral-Fin Extended-Surface Exchangers --
4.7. Duct Coolers --
4.8. Selecting Several Air Coolers to Dissipate Heat --
4.9. Calculating Surface and Airflow Area for Fin Coils --
Chapter 5. Extended-Surface Metallurgy --
5.1. Selecting Aluminum or Copper Fins --
5.2. Fins of Materials Other Than Copper or Aluminum --
5.3. Lowfin Tubes --
5.4. Some Rules of Thumb for Finned Surfaces --
Chapter 6. Air Cooler Fans or Blowers --
6.1. Fan Coverage and Bundle Geometry --
6.2. Fans and Blowers --
6.3. Fan Drives --
Chapter 7. Exchangers with Longitudinal-Fin Tubes --
7.1. Double-Pipe Exchangers --
7.2. Tank Heaters --
7.3. Line Heaters --
7.4. Overall Heat Transfer Rate Using Longitudinal-Fin Tubes --
Chapter 8. Plate Exchangers --
8.1. Construction Features --
8.2. Plate Exchangers versus Shell-and-Tube and Double-Pipe Exchangers --
8.3. Advantages and Disadvantages of Plate Exchangers --
8.4. Planning Ahead --
8.5. Cost Observation --
8.6. A Seasonal Application --
Chapter 9. Comparing Exchanger Types --
9.1. Air Cooler Header Limits --
9.2. Limitations in the Selection of Finned Surface --
Chapter 10. Fouling Factor Considerations --
10.1. Plant Conditions --
10.2. Fouling Effect on Various Exchanger Designs --
10.3. Dealing with the Consequences --
10.4. Ways of Minimizing the Effect of Fouling --
10.5. Accounting for Fouling When Selecting an Exchanger --
Chapter 11. Manifolds and Headers --
11.1. Selecting Manifolds --
11.2. Air Cooler Headers and Their Limitations --
11.3. Header Nozzle Locations and Quarter Points --
11.4. Lube Oil Cooler Header Design --
11.5. Four Liquid Coolers in Parallel --
Chapter 12. Freezing --
12.1. Antifreeze --
12.2. Draining --
12.3. Heating Air or Water --
12.4. Air Recirculation in Duct Systems --
12.5. Electric Heaters --
12.6. Hot Water and Steam Coils --
12.7. Other Causes of Freezing, and Other Precautions --
Chapter 13. The Iterative Process of Exchanger Selection --
13.1. Shell-and-Tube Units --
13.2. Air Coolers --
13.3. Double-Pipe Exchangers --
13.4. Plate Exchangers --
Chapter 14. Techniques to Reduce the Size of an Exchanger --
14.1. Cooling with Hydrogen Gas --
14.2. Lowfins --
14.3. Internally and Externally Finned Tubes --
14.4. Turbulators --
14.5. Automatic Brush Cleaners --
14.6. Small-Diameter Tubes --
14.7. Advantages of Plate Exchangers over Shell-and-Tube Units --
14.8. Designs That Use Fewer Finned Tubes per Layer and More Layers Chapter 15. Techniques to Reduce Exchanger or System Cost --
15.1. Quantity of Refrigerant in System --
15.2. Case Study: Quench Oil Cooler --
15.3. Air-Cooled Furfural Cooler Selection --
15.4. Code and Noncode Units --
15.5. Tubing --
15.6. Shop Assembly --
15.7. Rapid Delivery --
15.8. Energy --
15.9. Material and Construction Considerations --
Chapter 16. Adding Surface While Minimizing Downtime --
16.1. Add More Plates in Plate Exchangers --
16.2. Change Fin Material --
16.3. Add a Precooler in the Makeup Air Line --
16.4. Add Double-Pipe Units to a Bank of Exchangers --
16.5. Replace Bundles with Smaller-Diameter or Lowfin Tubes --
16.6. Air Coolers --
16.7. Insulation --
Chapter 17. Features That Should Make Selections Unacceptable --
17.1. Face Velocity (Coil) and Air Velocity (Duct) --
17.2. Water Velocity Limits --
17.3. Noise --
17.4. Stacking Units --
17.5. Conserving Energy --
17.6. Dimensional Limits --
17.7. Liquid Flow across Fins --
Chapter 18. The Significance of Metal Temperature --
18.1. Significance of Tube-Wall Temperature in Sizing an Exchanger --
18.2. Condenser Driving Force --
18.3. Heating with Desuperheated Steam --
18.4. Bulk Viscosity and Tube-Wall Viscosity --
18.5. Changing Metallurgy --
18.6. Subcooling --
18.7. Product Temperature Too High --
18.8. Reboilers --
18.9. Thermal Expansion in U-Tube Exchangers --
18.10. Radiant Energy Affecting a Roof or Canopy --
18.11. Tank Shell --
18.12. Cables and Circuit Breakers --
Chapter 19. Thermally Correct Systems That Do Not Perform --
19.1. Identifying the Problem --
19.2. Obstruction or Lack of Obstruction to Flow --
19.3. Undersized Screen Room Ductwork --
19.4. Airflows in A/C and ECS Systems --
19.5. Header Size of Lube Oil Air Cooler --
19.6. Quench Oil Cooler Inlet Design --
19.7. Plate-and-Frame Exchanger --
19.8. Cumulative Pressure Drop --
19.9. Chiller Plant --
19.10. Refinery --
19.11. Starving Fans --
19.12. Flow Restrictions --
19.13. Avoiding Bypassing: A Checklist for Inspectors --
19.14. Baffles --
19.15. Other Causes of Underperformance --
19.16. Summary: Causes and Cost of Failures --
Chapter 20. Recirculation --
20.1. Air Coolers --
20.2. Starving Fans --
20.3. Building-Air Recirculation --
20.4. Duct Design --
20.5. Water Recirculation --
20.6. Controlled Recirculation --
20.7. Recirculation Hints --
Chapter 21. Shipping and Handling --
21.1. Shock Load --
21.2. Access to Site --
21.3. Installation Location --
21.4. Manufacturing Location --
21.5. Width Considerations --
21.6. Weight Considerations --
21.7. Travel Restrictions --
21.8. Field Assembly --
21.9. Mounting Pads or Footings --
21.10. A Radiation Condition --
Chapter 22. Relative Humidity --
22.1. Parked Trailer Operating Condition --
22.2. Auditorium --
Part 2. Air-Conditioning Exchangers --
Chapter 23. Characteristics, Components, and Performance of A/C System Exchangers --
23.1. Addressing Problems of A/C Systems and Performance --
23.2. A/C System Component Exchangers: Evaporators and Condensers --
23.3. Air-Conditioning System Evaporators --
23.4. A/C System Condensers --
Chapter 24. Underperformance in A/C Systems Due to Ducting Problems --
24.1. Sound-Deadening or Insulation Material Added --
24.2. Ducts Not Built in Accordance with Calculations --
24.3. Breaks in Duct Continuity --
24.4. Duct Turning Vane Faults --
24.5. Airflow Reduced by Air Filters --
24.6. Blocking or Altering a Supply or Return --
24.7. Louvered Door Replaced --
24.8. Takeoffs Added Reducing Airflow to Other Rooms --
24.9. Makeup Air Quantity Increased Chapter 25. Other Conditions That Cause A/C Systems to Underperform --
25.1. Operating Conditions That Reduce the Capacity of Evaporators --
25.2. Condenser Subjected to Solar Radiation --
25.3. ECS Systems Operated at Other Than Design Conditions --
25.4. Replacing Coils Solely on the Basis of Similar Dimensions --
Chapter 26. Ways of Increasing the Cooling Capacity of a System --
26.1. Add a Precooler in the Makeup Air Line --
26.2. Insulate the Building --
26.3. Add a Water-Cooled Unit in the Area to Be Cooled --
26.4. Install a Sun Shield above the Condenser --
26.5. Spray an Air-Cooled Condenser with Water --
26.6. Provide Colder Water to Air-Handling Units --
Chapter 27. Conditions That Can Make an A/C System Unacceptable --
27.1. Uncleanable A/C Drains --
27.2. Noise --
27.3. Recirculation --
27.4. Screen Room Cooling Condensation --
27.5. System Shutdown Due to Solar Radiation --
27.6. Exceeding the Air Velocity Limit --
Part 3. The Cooling of Electronics --
Chapter 28. Electronic Installations and Their Heat Problems --
28.1. Nature of the Problem --
28.2. Cooling Needs of Electronic Installations --
28.3. Placing Cooling in Perspective --
28.4. Troubleshooting Airflow Problems in Electronic Installations --
28.5. Improving Cooling in Existing Racks --
28.6. The Electronics Heat Exchanger System --
28.7. Addressing Causes of Failure --
28.8. Environmental Control System Concerns --
Chapter 29. Lessons for Electronic Engineers --
29.1. Overheating in Racks --
29.2. Overheating Due to Screen Room Conditions --
29.3. The Solution to a Common Problem --
29.4. Screen Room As Duct Conditions That Have Caused Component Overheating (Table 29-1) --
29.5. Racks As Ducts Conditions That Have Caused Component Overheating (Table 29-2) --
29.6. Suggestions For Correcting Existing Electronics Overheating Problems (Table 29-3) --
29.7. Suggested Changes in Screen Room and Racks to Avoid Electronics Overheating (Table 29-4) --
29.8. Causes of Electronics Overheating Failures Other Than Duct Conditions (Table 29-5) --
29.9. Fan and Blower Considerations --
Chapter 30. Overheating Electronics and Corrective Steps to Take --
30.1. A Screen Room Recommendation --
30.2. An Overview of Sizing Ducts and Racks --
30.3. Tight Packaging --
30.4. The Choice of Rack Width --
30.5. Spacing Between Racks --
30.6. The Screen Room Duct Connection --
30.7. The Size of Screen Room Inlet and Outlet Ducts --
30.8. The Flow Areas of Racks and Exchangers Compared --
30.9. The Sizing of Racks as Ducts --
30.10. Overview of Electronics Cooling Issues --
30.11. Mobile Equipment --
30.12. Maintenance --
30.13. Summary --
30.14. Other Factors --
Chapter 31. The Cause of Most Field Problems --
31.1. Flow Area Conditions That Have Caused Trouble --
31.2. Flow Area Conditions That Affect Performance --
31.3. Providing More Flow Area Than Wanted Causes Problems Similar to These --
31.4. Design Conditions --
Index.
Responsibility: Michael J. Nee.

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