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Helvetica and the New York City subway system : the true (maybe) story Titelvorschau
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Helvetica and the New York City subway system : the true (maybe) story

Verfasser/in: Paul Shaw
Verlag: Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, ©2011.
Ausgabe/Format   Print book : Englisch : Rev. edAlle Ausgaben und Formate anzeigen
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
For years, the signs in the New York City subway system were a bewildering hodge-podge of lettering styles, sizes, shapes, materials, colors, and messages. The original mosaics (dating from as early as 1904), displaying a variety of serif and sans serif letters and decorative elements, were supplemented by signs in terracotta and cut stone. Over the years, enamel signs identifying stations and warning riders not to  Weiterlesen…
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Dokumenttyp: Buch
Alle Autoren: Paul Shaw
ISBN: 9780262015486 026201548X
OCLC-Nummer: 667213073
Beschreibung: xi, 131 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 x 29 cm
Inhalt: Introduction --
The labyrinth --
Bringing order out of chaos --
Transportation signage systems in the 1960s --
The New York City Transit Authority and Unimark International --
The myth of the Helvetica juggernaut --
Standard, Helvetica, and the New York City subway system --
The fate of the Unimark system --
Helvetica infiltrates the New York City subway system --
Helvetica triumphant : the subway system today --
Chronology.
Verfasserangabe: Paul Shaw.

Abstract:

How New York City subways signage evolved from a "visual mess" to a uniform system with Helvetica triumphant.  Weiterlesen…

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"A concise history of the New York subway, a visual archive of century's worth of underground signs (some of which are still in use), and an impressive study of the conflict between the purity of Weiterlesen…

 
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