skip to content
Heroic orientation in the Scooter tetralogy Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Heroic orientation in the Scooter tetralogy

Author: Michael Douglas Ward
Publisher: 2006.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--St. Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas, 2006.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Albert Murray (b. 1916) is well respected as a socio-literary critic among the African American literati, though not widely known beyond. He has written extensively on the "Hero's" role in civilization, including the Hero's role in African American culture. In regard to Black culture, Murray has attempted to show an innate link between Heroism and improvisation in the Blues and Jazz. Less well known as a writer of  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Albert Murray; Albert Murray; Albert Murray; Albert Murray; Albert Murray
Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Douglas Ward
OCLC Number: 70810479
Notes: "April 2006."
Description: ix, 99 leaves : col. ill. ; 29 cm.
Responsibility: by Michael Douglas Ward.

Abstract:

Albert Murray (b. 1916) is well respected as a socio-literary critic among the African American literati, though not widely known beyond. He has written extensively on the "Hero's" role in civilization, including the Hero's role in African American culture. In regard to Black culture, Murray has attempted to show an innate link between Heroism and improvisation in the Blues and Jazz. Less well known as a writer of fiction, Murray's tetralogy, consisting of Train Whistle Guitar (1974), The Spyglass Tree (1991), The Seven League Boots (1995), and The Magic Keys (2005), is a roman à clef that describes the maturation of a writer as Hero. Much insight into the tetralogy can be gained by applying Murray's own theoretical observations on the nature of the Hero. But these observations can be augmented by the formulations of other theorists of the Hero, including Carl Gustav Jung and Northrop Frye. Although each theorist approaches the problem of the Hero from a different vantage point, each sees the Heroic project as crucial to both individual and social well-being. In particular, Murray approaches the question of Hero from the standpoint of African American culture in the 1920s and 1930s; however, ultimately, he reaches beyond to address the timeless necessity of the Hero. Above all, each of these three theorists enables the Heroic gesture in the Scooter tetralogy to be viewed as a representation of the eternal human drama.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/70810479>
bgn:inSupportOf"Thesis (M.A.)--St. Mary's University, San Antonio, Texas, 2006."
library:oclcnum"70810479"
rdf:typebgn:Thesis
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:valueUnknown value: deg
rdf:valueUnknown value: mss
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2006"
schema:description"Albert Murray (b. 1916) is well respected as a socio-literary critic among the African American literati, though not widely known beyond. He has written extensively on the "Hero's" role in civilization, including the Hero's role in African American culture. In regard to Black culture, Murray has attempted to show an innate link between Heroism and improvisation in the Blues and Jazz. Less well known as a writer of fiction, Murray's tetralogy, consisting of Train Whistle Guitar (1974), The Spyglass Tree (1991), The Seven League Boots (1995), and The Magic Keys (2005), is a roman à clef that describes the maturation of a writer as Hero. Much insight into the tetralogy can be gained by applying Murray's own theoretical observations on the nature of the Hero. But these observations can be augmented by the formulations of other theorists of the Hero, including Carl Gustav Jung and Northrop Frye. Although each theorist approaches the problem of the Hero from a different vantage point, each sees the Heroic project as crucial to both individual and social well-being. In particular, Murray approaches the question of Hero from the standpoint of African American culture in the 1920s and 1930s; however, ultimately, he reaches beyond to address the timeless necessity of the Hero. Above all, each of these three theorists enables the Heroic gesture in the Scooter tetralogy to be viewed as a representation of the eternal human drama."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/57837211>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Heroic orientation in the Scooter tetralogy"@en
schema:publication
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.