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Heroines

Author: Kate Zambreno
Publisher: Los Angeles, CA : Semiotext(e), Cambridge, Mass. ; London : MIT Press [2012] ©2012
Series: Semiotext(e) active agents series.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"On the last day of December, 2009 Kate Zambreno began a blog called Frances Farmer Is My Sister, arising from her obsession with the female modernists and her recent transplantation to Akron, Ohio, where her husband held a university job. Widely reposted, Zambreno's blog became an outlet for her highly informed and passionate rants about the fates of the modernist "wives and mistresses." In her blog entries,  Read more...
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Named Person: Kate Zambreno
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Kate Zambreno
ISBN: 9781584351146 1584351144
OCLC Number: 793580741
Description: 309 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Series Title: Semiotext(e) active agents series.
Responsibility: Kate Zambreno.

Abstract:

"On the last day of December, 2009 Kate Zambreno began a blog called Frances Farmer Is My Sister, arising from her obsession with the female modernists and her recent transplantation to Akron, Ohio, where her husband held a university job. Widely reposted, Zambreno's blog became an outlet for her highly informed and passionate rants about the fates of the modernist "wives and mistresses." In her blog entries, Zambreno reclaimed the traditionally pathologized biographies of Vivienne Eliot, Jane Bowles, Jean Rhys, and Zelda Fitzgerald: writers and artists themselves who served as male writers' muses only to end their lives silenced, erased, and institutionalized. Over the course of two years, Frances Farmer Is My Sister helped create a community where today's "toxic girls" could devise a new feminist discourse, writing in the margins and developingan alternative canon. In Heroines, Zambreno extends the polemic begun on her blog into a dazzling, original work of literary scholarship. Combing theories that have dictated what literature should be and who is allowed to write it--from T.S. Eliot's New Criticism to the writings of such mid-century intellectuals as Elizabeth Hardwick and Mary McCarthy to the occasional "girl-on-girl crime" of the Second Wave of feminism--she traces the genesis of a cultural template that consistently exiles female experience to the realm of the "minor," and diagnoses women for transgressing social bounds. "ANXIETY: When she experiences it, it's pathological," writes Zambreno. "When he does, it's existential." By advancing the Girl-As-Philosopher, Zambreno reinvents feminism for her generation while providing a model for a newly subjectivized criticism."--Books.google.com.

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The book is startlingly insightful. Listed in "Books You Should Read" Jezebel.com Issues a powerful clarion call for a supportive community of female writers who will fixate on their own experiences Read more...

 
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